legislation and regulation

Operations

Nearly one in five Americans struggle with food insecurity

In this month’s Editor’s Letter, I wrote about a new focus for my blog in the upcoming months: hunger.

Operations

Technology versus privacy

I was reading an article the other day about a bill currently making its way through the Florida legislature that would ban the use of biometrics in school cafeterias in the interest of protecting children’s privacy.

New breakfast regulations are easier to meet and are causing fewer negative student reactions than last year's lunch ones. That's borne out by statistics that show participation for the morning meal holding steady in the past two years. This year's K-12 Census Report also looks at the cost per meal, participation levels and the new competitive foods rules.

This year’s Legislative Action Conference (LAC), held last week in Washington, D.C., saw nearly 900 child nutrition professionals brave a winter storm in our nation’s capital.

Pocono schools say they cut out junk food a long time ago, so new federal rules allowing schools to advertise only healthy foods should be no problem.

What do cigarettes, alcohol, drugs and salt have in common? They are all being regulated in some way by the U.S. government due to their potential negative effects on health.

If low-income children can't afford a nutritious, hot lunch, the state of Minnesota should pick up the tab, the House Education Finance Committee decided Thursday.

State lawmakers have passed a new food safety law that they wish they hadn't.

A new government study indicates that school districts have struggled to implement the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s revamped nutrition standards for school meals, while others are eating more fruits and vegetables.

Several years ago, I attended my first Legislative Action Committee (LAC) conference. This was before the 2010 reauthorization of the Child Nutrition Act, which put into place the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act (HHFKA).

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