Oil-Poached Swordfish

Menu Part: 
Entree
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
4

Grilled swordfish can get very dry, very quickly. This oil-poaching method of preparation will cook the steaks slowly, and reward you with a moist, flavorful fish.

Ingredients

Marinade:
1⁄2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1⁄2 cup canola oil
12 cracked black peppercorns
Grated zest from 1 lemon
3 bay leaves
3 sprigs fresh thyme
2 sprigs fresh rosemary

4 center-cut swordfish steaks (6 oz. each)
Salt and pepper, to taste

Poaching Liquid:
About 6 cups canola oil
About 2 cups extra-virgin olive oil
1⁄2 head unpeeled garlic,
cut horizontally

Preserved Lemon Sauce:
Rind of 1 preserved lemon, finely chopped
2 tbsp. finely chopped green Sicilian-style olives
1⁄2 cup stock
1 tsp. preserved lemon liquid
1 tbsp. butter
1 tbsp. each chopped fresh parsley and chives
Salt and pepper, to taste

Gnocchi sautéed with pickled ramps, chorizo, and hen-of-the-woods mushrooms

Steps

1. In a casserole or baking dish, combine oils, peppercorns, lemon zest, bay leaves, thyme, and rosemary. Submerge swordfish steaks in oil mixture. Refrigerate and marinate overnight, or at least 2-3 hr.

2. Season fish steaks with salt and freshly ground pepper; grill briefly in two directions to make cross marks on both sides of steaks. Remove from grill.

3. Into a stainless steel, heavy-bottomed pot, pour enough canola and olive oil to cover fish steaks (using a three- parts to one-part ratio). Add garlic. Over low to medium heat, slowly bring the oil temperature up to 110°F. Place grilled steaks into poaching oil and simmer until fish is cooked through, about 5-10 min.

4. Meanwhile, prepare Preserved Lemon Sauce: In a small saucepan, combine chopped lemon rind, olives, stock, and lemon liquid. Simmer over medium heat until heated through. Right before serving, swirl in butter and herbs; season with salt and pepper.

5. For service, place fish steaks on a bed of sautéed gnocchi; spoon preserved lemon sauce on top.

Source: By Chef Brian Bistrong

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