legislation and regulation

Operations

District's school lunch program at odds with federal mandates

Brandon Valley’s school lunch program is at odds with the White House – or at least with the new federal guidelines that mandate more fresh fruits, whole-grain and low-sodium foods and fewer “competitive foods,” such as cookies.

Operations

Food costs makng it difficult to serve healthy food in schools

The White House waded into in the middle of a Congressional food fight over how to regulate school lunch.

First lady Michelle Obama and school lunch ladies used to be on the same team, but now they’re locked in a political war against each other.

Some school districts think biometrics are a key to faster lunch service. But not everyone believes the technology is worth the risks.

The ferocity of first lady Michelle Obama's counterattack against a proposal to temporarily waive school lunch standards shows what's really at stake in Congress: a $10 billion effort to wean Americans off junk food.

At a school where a teacher says too many kids go hungry, hundreds of pounds of unopened food are being thrown away in a dumpster each week.

Area school officials say economic concerns — and changing taste buds of students — are reasons they have no plans to opt out of federal healthier meal standards.

As Washington debates school lunch standards rolling out across the country, several local school officials said the changes are not very effective in the fight against childhood obesity and in some cases are leading to food waste.

While the debate of school nutrition guidelines rolls on, foodservice workers are dealing with their own internal food fight.

The gloves came off last week. After the USDA announced leniency for rules regarding whole-grain pasta, the U.S. House backed a bill that would allow districts to opt out of new school meal pattern regulations if they could prove the rules were a financial burden.

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