Paul King

Paul King
Paul King
foodservicedirector@winsightmedia.com

A journalist for more than three decades, Paul began his career as a general assignment reporter, working for several daily and weekly newspapers in southwestern Pennsylvania. A decision to move to New York City in 1984 sent his career path in another direction when he was hired to be an associate editor at Food Management magazine. He has covered the foodservice industry ever since. After 11 years at Food Management, he joined Nation’s Restaurant News in 1995. In June 2006 he was hired as senior editor at FoodService Director and became its editor-in-chief in March 2007. A native of Pittsburgh, he is a graduate of Duquesne University with a bachelor’s degree in journalism and speech.


When 39 school foodservice directors and their affiliates gathered in December in Minneapolis, Minn., for a three-day culinary “boot camp,” they did more than taste food and share ideas.

From drinking more red wine to crisis management, non-commercial operators learned important lessons at MenuDirections 2015.

MenuDirections 2015 kicked off Sunday in Memphis at The Peabody Hotel with a motivational opening presentation, two culinary workshops and the conference’s annual Dine-Around. Here are five takeaways from the event’s first day.

Every year, some institution finds itself in hot water over a Black History Month culinary event.

Building a blueprint for the future starts with meaningful design. Here's a look at the Flavor HArvest Cafe at HealthPark Medical Center...
Building a blueprint for the future starts with meaningful design. Here's a look at The Edge dining facility at Michigan State University...
UCSD 64 degrees
The university spent $12.1 million to renovate the Revelle Dining Commons into 64 Degrees and Roger’s Market.
banner health plate
Merger with University of Arizona Health Network in the works.

The shuttering of the Showboat, Revel Casino Hotel, Trump Plaza Hotel in Atlantic City and The Atlantic Club Casino Hotel left the area reeling.

The District Market on the University of Washington campus is a far cry from your typical on-campus convenience store.

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Industry News & Opinion

The University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Ind., will soon switch over from magnetic strip-based student ID cards to chip-based ones, The Observer reports.

Along with being more secure, the new cards will allow students easier access to dining halls, enabling them to simply tap their cards on a reader to gain entrance. Students will also be able to add flex points and Domer Dollars—which can be used at eateries on and off campus—to their accounts via a mobile app.

The new cards are expected to be available by the time school begins next fall.

Read the full story...

Industry News & Opinion

University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minn., has replaced a fajita bar in one of its dining halls with a superfoods bar, Tommie Media reports.

Aiming to provide more options for athletes and students with dietary restrictions, the new bar offers diners a choice of protein with a variety of toppings, such as beans, fruit, couscous and quinoa.

The superfoods bar has made a few appearances on campus since it was first tried for the school’s football players last summer.

“Word of mouth is getting out, and every day I get a few more people,” Ryan Carlson, a cook at the...

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gluten free diet

From Stouffer’s.

A large part of menuing allergen-friendly cuisine is deciding which gluten-free items to serve.

In particular, college dining hall operators must decide whether to make gluten-free items in-house or to order gluten-free items from a manufacturer. Some factors to consider are: the size of the university, the demand for gluten-free options,and the ability to have separate gluten-free storage and workspaces in the university dining hall kitchen.

According to FoodService Director , 77% of college and university operators purchase their gluten-free...

Industry News & Opinion

Reading Hospital in West Reading, Pa., is using robots to help deliver patient meals, BCTV reports.

The eight robots, named TUGs, will be used to transport meals from the hospital’s nutrition services department to patient floors at Reading HealthPlex for Advanced Surgical & Patient Care.

Moving at three miles per hour, the robots will follow preprogrammed routes to the HealthPlex, where room ambassadors will remove room service carts from the TUGs and deliver them to patients. The TUGs will then return to nutrition services with dirty dishes for cleaning.

The...

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