Paul King

Paul King
Paul King

A journalist for more than three decades, Paul began his career as a general assignment reporter, working for several daily and weekly newspapers in southwestern Pennsylvania. A decision to move to New York City in 1984 sent his career path in another direction when he was hired to be an associate editor at Food Management magazine. He has covered the foodservice industry ever since. After 11 years at Food Management, he joined Nation’s Restaurant News in 1995. In June 2006 he was hired as senior editor at FoodService Director and became its editor-in-chief in March 2007. A native of Pittsburgh, he is a graduate of Duquesne University with a bachelor’s degree in journalism and speech.

One day in May many years ago, I was one of a group of panelists talking about trends in non-commercial foodservice at the Foodservice Consultants Society International’s annual meeting in Chicago during the National Restaurant Show.

sono northwestern hospital cafe
When Northwestern Healthcare, in downtown Chicago, decided to close Café 251 at Northwestern Memorial Hospital earlier this fall, it made a strategic move that not only salvaged the cafeteria’s two...
gloves trash can
When the California state legislature last year passed a law requiring gloves to be worn by anyone handling ready-to-eat (RTE) food, politicians didn’t expect much, if any, fallout.

When foodservice operators talk about “growing their own,” they’re usually referring to setting up a permaculture garden on campus or growing herbs on a hospital rooftop.

As part of our ongoing Signature Series, we asked operators to share their popular recipes featuring salads.
gmo corn test tube
Genetic engineering has sparked a heated food-related debate. Three countries—Benin, Serbia and Zambia—have banned GMOs (genetically modified organisms) outright.
The following scene is played out daily in school districts all across the country: A child selects a lunch and takes it to the cashier station. The cashier calls up the student’s meal...

The October issue of FoodService Director will contain an Analysis piece I wrote entitled “The Great GMO Debate.” The article examines the concept of genetic engineering in agriculture and why some people, companies and organizations are so high on it while others are convinced it could mean the death of agriculture.

Food vendors doing business with Overlake Hospital Medical Center (OHMC), in Seattle, know without ambiguity what products the hospital’s hospitality dining services department does and does not want.

woman packaging frozen meals
As the number of senior citizens—and their desire to remain at home—increases, foodservice programs such as Meals On Wheels increasingly struggle to remain viable.


More From FoodService Director

Ideas and Innovation
bus advertising jagermeister

Because many locals use the bus system, we paid for some full bus wraps to advertise [job openings within] our dining services program. The buses go all over campus where students can see them, and to apartments where the public can see them. To top it off, the cost wasn’t much more than newspaper rates.

Managing Your Business
line kings girl goat open kitchen

Open kitchen concepts satisfy guests’ curiosity and desire for transparency. But there are some caveats. Here’s how to create a positive experience for both staff and customers when the walls are down.

Train to serve

With the back-of-house up front, everybody gets hospitality training. “Our cooks understand the food and what they’re doing incredibly, but translating that to guests requires [soft] skills that need to be honed,” says Marie Petulla, co-owner of two restaurants in Southern California.

Dress for a mess

At Girl & The Goat in Chicago, chef-owner Stephanie...

Ideas and Innovation
regions hospital exterior

One of our new concepts, YumMarket, is a play off our YumPower brand that we have out in the community. We use YumPower in K-12 schools, and there’s a kiosk in a nearby minor league ballpark. We feature only better-for-you choices, such as fresh-made pizzas, sandwiches and healthy grain salads. We want people to know we are taking care of people here the same way we are in the overall community.

Ideas and Innovation
herb garden wall

In high-volume operations, few look at herb gardens as the end-all-be-all budgeting solution. But that doesn’t mean there isn’t a return on the investment. The value, operators say, is in the message herb gardens and herb walls send—that an operation uses ingredients that are fresh, sustainable and healthy. Here’s how the growing areas have paid off at three operations.

A cafeteria wall at Miles River Middle School in South Hamilton, Mass., houses three rows of hydroponic lettuce spearheaded by an interdisciplinary group of health, science, math, technology and foodservice employees...

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