Paul King

Paul King
Paul King
foodservicedirector@winsightmedia.com

A journalist for more than three decades, Paul began his career as a general assignment reporter, working for several daily and weekly newspapers in southwestern Pennsylvania. A decision to move to New York City in 1984 sent his career path in another direction when he was hired to be an associate editor at Food Management magazine. He has covered the foodservice industry ever since. After 11 years at Food Management, he joined Nation’s Restaurant News in 1995. In June 2006 he was hired as senior editor at FoodService Director and became its editor-in-chief in March 2007. A native of Pittsburgh, he is a graduate of Duquesne University with a bachelor’s degree in journalism and speech.


I have been a reluctant participant in much of the technology that has been developed and refined over the last 10 to 15 years. I’ve been convinced that we rely too much on technology, and incidents such as the stock market glitch of last week that helped to send the Dow Jones Industrial Average plummeting for a time tend to reinforce that opinion in my mind.

I read an article last week in the Wall Street Journal that brought back memories of features I’ve written over the years on prison foodservice.

On Tuesday, FoodService Director takes to the airwaves—specifically, community access television in Anne Arundel County, Maryland. I’ve agreed to be interviewed by Foodservice Supervisor Jodi Risse on a local program called Food 4 Thought.

Given all that has happened over the last two years, particularly in the financial services industry, “business ethics” would seem to have become an oxymoron.

The coming of spring is always exciting, especially here in the Northeast. It brings new life and the promise of change for the better after a cold and dark winter.

Operators in non-commercial foodservice never get enough credit, it seems, for the work they do. Often they are judged, unfairly, against commercial restaurants and found lacking.

When I prepared to travel to Chile in February, I really didn’t know what to expect, other than the fact that I was going to escape the cold Northeastern winter for South American summer for a week.

With two days left in our Chilean excursion, we began Thursday with a visit to Jumbo, a supermarket in the Las Condes section of Santiago. After our visit, I remarked that Walmart needs to rethink its use of the term “supercenter.” This store, known as a “hipermercado,” is the largest food store in Chile. It sports 67 checkout lines.

It is hard to believe that more than a week has passed since I returned from my food tour of Chile, perhaps because the events of that week still seem fresh in my mind.

I had planned this week to regale readers with details of my wonderfully enlightening trip to Chile, and I still will do that, as well as post a photo slide show of the tour. But the trip had a somber aftermath, with the devastating 8.8-magnitude earthquake that struck the country early Saturday morning.

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