Welcome to the new FoodService Director

After 25 years, FSD gets a facelift.

We recognize that some stories can’t be told in that quick-hitting format, so we’ve bolstered our feature well. In this section you’ll find our cover stories, FSD of the Month and Under 30, our popular column profiling the rising industry stars. New to the magazine is the analysis story. This is where we’ll investigate and dig deep into the issues that are most affecting foodservice. These stories aren’t just the who and what of an issue; it’s about the why, with a particular emphasis on how these topics will influence your operations in the months and years to come.

Perhaps the biggest change you’ll notice is in our food pages. We hear every day how customers are more food and nutrition savvy than they were even 10 years ago. You’ve been tasked with elevating your programs to meet those increasing demands. So we’re also upping our game. We’ve increased our breadth of coverage greatly in the food pages. We’re continuing our popular Menu Strategies and Ingredients stories, but we’ve added some exciting new features:

  • Three Takes On: As a proud Texan, Becky knows there are no beans in chili—a fact that came as quite the shock to Bill, an Illinoisan. That’s where the idea for this story came from. This country is full of regional differences in food, and menu inspiration can be found in a variety of outlets. This story highlights those differences by sharing three versions of the same menu item.
  • Menu Signatures: Here we’ll profile the dish for which an operation is best known.
  • Desserts and Beverages: Menu planning isn’t just about the entrée and sides, and this story allows us to help guide you in creating your entire menu portfolio. Each month, either a dessert or beverage will be featured.
  • Growers’ Insights: Farm-to-table is a big part of your business philosophy. This story is about providing you with the growers’ perspective, to help you foster better relationships with your local farmers. In this column, you’ll read about what it takes to grow a certain crop, what affects the pricing of that crop and what varieties are available.
  • Creating Healthier Menus: As the name suggests, this column is about health and your menus. We’ll share tips from operations on how they’ve accomplished tasks like reducing sodium.
  • Recipe Revamp: This popular online column finds a home in the new book. Here we’ll showcase how an operator has taken a recipe and tweaked it to become a better-for-you version.

Speaking of online columns, look for more integration between our print and online properties. We know just how important online resources are to doing your job well, so we’ll be beefing up our online reservoir. Whenever you see a red callout on the pages, that’s your cue that there’s an online component to that story. For example, many of our food pages have red callouts for recipes. We’ve transferred most of our recipes online because we feel that’s an easier way to search—and then actually use—those recipes in your operation.

Last, but certainly not least, you’ll notice the pages of FoodService Director have a new, clean and modern look. We’ve updated our color scheme and fonts to provide you with a more easily read product. We’ve added more art and illustrations to our pages. Foodservice is a visual industry, and the pages of our magazine have been redesigned to reflect that through visual storytelling. We’ve also revamped our cover treatment, starting with an updated, more modern logo. We’re featuring a more dominant cover image in an open, airy look. This treatment is similar to one you’d see on magazines on the newsstand. We’re also putting more emphasis on our FSDs of the Month to highlight their hard work and dedication.

As we move into the next 25 years of our publishing history, we’d like to thank you, our readers, for your loyalty, support and sharing your stories with us.  

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FSD Resources