Welcome to the new FoodService Director

After 25 years, FSD gets a facelift.

Twenty-five years ago FoodService Director published its first issue. On this silver anniversary, we’re pleased to unveil the all new FSD.

It’s been six years since this magazine last received a face-lift, and in those years much has changed. Food-related media has skyrocketed. Food trucks took to the streets. Gluten free has replaced sustainability as the industry’s hot topic. Smartphones and tablets grace the hands of even your youngest customers. And, perhaps the biggest influencer of all, the economy crashed.

Non-commercial foodservice has changed, and the pages of this magazine have been redesigned to reflect your changing—and growing—job responsibilities.

Your time is precious. With an ever-increasing to-do list, we understand that you often don’t have an hour or two to peruse the pages of a magazine. With that in mind, we’ve made several significant changes to the way we provide information to you. In the front of the book you’ll find several short stories on each page. These items are designed to give you the information you need to know in an easily digestible format.

Our front-of-book sections include:

  • What You Need to Know: These stories about the news and programs that are shaping the industry will inform you on what’s happening in non-commercial foodservice.
  • Emerging Trends: These are the stories that we think will affect the development of your programs. And because we recognize that there are so many influencers outside of the non-commercial industry, we’ll be sharing ideas from our colleagues in commercial restaurants, c-stores and industry partners on this page.
  • Managing Your Business: You’re being tasked to do more with less. But that doesn’t mean innovation can’t occur. On this page we’ll profile some operations that have found a way to control their costs without stifling creativity.
  • Steal This Idea: One of the carryovers from the previous FSD magazine, this popular page will remain in the new incarnation
Keywords: 
new concepts

More From FoodService Director

Industry News & Opinion
CP building

Central Point School District in Central Point, Ore., is sprucing up its lunch program by adding more locally produced foods and scratch-made dishes, KDRV reports.

A nutritionist and chef from the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council trained school staff on 15 new recipes with the goal of upgrading the school lunch menu.

The ongoing project has been successfully implemented in other Oregon school districts over the last eight years. The trainings focus on Oregon State University Extension Food Hero recipes that meet USDA nutrition standards and incorporate locally sourced...

Industry News & Opinion

Carson City School District in Carson City, Nev., hosted its Breakfast with a Hero event this week, Carson Now reports.

Held at an elementary school, the event invited local law enforcement to serve breakfast and eat with students. Officials say the event was intended to help students connect and engage with local officers in a casual setting.

Read the full story via carsonnow.org .

Photo by Dan Davis at Carson City School District

Industry News & Opinion

Dining halls at Central Michigan University in Mount Pleasant, Mich., are switching from traditional beef burgers to plant-based burgers this week, Central Michigan Life reports.

The plant-forward event is aimed at promoting healthy, sustainable eating on campus. Each evening, a different black bean burger will be offered at campus dining halls, including Greek-and Mexican-themed options and a Cool Sriracha burger.

School officials say they will see how popular the new burgers are with students and then decide if they should continue to offer more plant-based dishes....

Industry News & Opinion

Spring Lake Grade School District in Manito, Ill., has planted an on-campus orchard to begin providing fresh fruit at lunch, The Journal Star reports.

Students and other members of the school community planted 20 apple, pear and peach trees this week. The district hopes to make its first harvest in about four years and wants to incorporate the produce into school meals. The trees were purchased using donations.

Spring Lake’s orchard is an extension of its school garden, which was planted last year and provides produce for the cafeteria.

Read the full story via...

FSD Resources