Welcome to the new FoodService Director

After 25 years, FSD gets a facelift.

Twenty-five years ago FoodService Director published its first issue. On this silver anniversary, we’re pleased to unveil the all new FSD.

It’s been six years since this magazine last received a face-lift, and in those years much has changed. Food-related media has skyrocketed. Food trucks took to the streets. Gluten free has replaced sustainability as the industry’s hot topic. Smartphones and tablets grace the hands of even your youngest customers. And, perhaps the biggest influencer of all, the economy crashed.

Non-commercial foodservice has changed, and the pages of this magazine have been redesigned to reflect your changing—and growing—job responsibilities.

Your time is precious. With an ever-increasing to-do list, we understand that you often don’t have an hour or two to peruse the pages of a magazine. With that in mind, we’ve made several significant changes to the way we provide information to you. In the front of the book you’ll find several short stories on each page. These items are designed to give you the information you need to know in an easily digestible format.

Our front-of-book sections include:

  • What You Need to Know: These stories about the news and programs that are shaping the industry will inform you on what’s happening in non-commercial foodservice.
  • Emerging Trends: These are the stories that we think will affect the development of your programs. And because we recognize that there are so many influencers outside of the non-commercial industry, we’ll be sharing ideas from our colleagues in commercial restaurants, c-stores and industry partners on this page.
  • Managing Your Business: You’re being tasked to do more with less. But that doesn’t mean innovation can’t occur. On this page we’ll profile some operations that have found a way to control their costs without stifling creativity.
  • Steal This Idea: One of the carryovers from the previous FSD magazine, this popular page will remain in the new incarnation
Keywords: 
new concepts

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From Mrs. Dash Foodservice.

There was a time when healthy food meant counting calories, omitting carbs, giving up sugar and going fat-free—in other words, it was all about deprivation.

But not anymore. Today’s definition of healthy means an overall focus on nutrition and wellness that doesn’t mean giving up enjoyment. It’s all about balance: good fats, healthy carbs, better sweeteners, wholesome ingredients and satisfying flavor enhancements. It means food that customers can feel good about, at the same time that they’re enjoying the dining experience.

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The new fast-casual concept, called Olilo by Cat Cora, promises a healthy, made-your-way menu, according to the global foodservice provider.

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We’ve reduced food costs by designing menus to utilize cast-offs. Take broccoli, for instance. Use the florets Monday for soup, then Tuesday use the stems for broccoli slaw, and so on. This results in total utilization of the product instead of waste.

FSD Resources