Operators differ about future management talent

B&I and colleges say we’re fine; schools and healthcare show concern.

Even with unemployment running high, foodservice operators aren’t sure if career hunters will want to follow in their footsteps. The key determinant, they say, is how well the industry spotlights the opportunities available today to prospective candidates.

Overall, directors are almost evenly split on the chances of drawing enough talent to replace the veterans who’ll retire from senior-level management posts in the next five years. Forty-nine percent of The Big Picture respondents say enough successors will be found, while 51% indicate they doubt it.

But confidence in averting a leadership gap varied widely from segment to segment.
Respondents from B&I are the most optimistic, with 84% saying they foresee no shortage of management professionals, followed by peers in colleges, with 59% predicting an adequate talent pool.

In sharp contrast, 61% of survey participants from schools indicate they expect a shortage of possible successors, and the outlook was only slightly better among the operators of healthcare facilities, with 54% expressing a pessimistic view.

Operators say awareness and familiarity with the opportunities afforded by each segment are responsible for the difference in opinion by segment. Dawn Houser, nutrition manager for Collier County (Fla.) Public Schools, says she wouldn’t trade her career for anything, but acknowledges that she stumbled upon it despite extensive education in hospitality management.

“In my four years at Penn State, not once did they mention school feeding as a career option,” she explains. “The culinary and hospitality schools don’t focus on this aspect of the business.”

Conversely, she says, “If you look at employee feeding, it closely mirrors what you see in the private retail sector,” a.k.a. restaurants, foodservice’s most visible and familiar job option.

Take that awareness and add the advantages of a nearly conventional workday and you have the reason why B&I operations “never have a shortage of applicants,” says Cavin Sullivan, general manager with Metz Culinary Management at JM Smucker Co., in Orrville, Ohio.

“We’ve all done the restaurants, the grind of the retail side,” he says. “I have a huge advantage being a Monday through Friday, 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. operation.

“I wish I’d known about the contract side a long time ago.” 

Fast Facts

51% of operators believe that there will not be enough trained management professionals within the next five years to take over for retirees.

More From FoodService Director

Industry News & Opinion

An agreement between Northwestern University’s new foodservice vendor and the union that represents many of the school’s service workers has put to rest some staff concerns over its upcoming vendor switch, reports The Daily Northwestern .

Unite Here Local 1 said that it met with representatives of Compass Group North America, which assumes control of the Evanston, Ill., school’s foodservice this fall, and reached a deal to ensure that staff who previously worked under Sodexo and Aramark would have job security with Compass. In addition, the agreement continues many benefits that...

Ideas and Innovation
scratch card

Two days a week, we do scratch card purchases of $6 or more to get a free item on the next visit. Patients and staff look forward to the Monday and Friday scratch card days. It increases sales on slow days as well as guest satisfaction.

Ideas and Innovation
ramen noodles

The Arkansas Heart Hospital in Little Rock has unveiled a new, full-time food truck called Food from the Heart. It’s the first hospital-owned and operated food truck in the nation, according to KATV .

The truck, which will offer a limited menu that includes Chef Coby Smith ’s popular ramen, served its first meal on May 2 and will roll out service throughout the area beginning next month, the report said.

In addition, it will have pop-up locations, allowing the hospital to extend its reach to communities outside metro Little Rock. The truck can also be used in emergency...

Industry News & Opinion

In a bid to boost sustainability, Dartmouth Dining Services recently replaced its paper straws with red-and-white paper versions that are biodegradable, The Dartmouth reports .

The move is “a small step but a very important one,” Associate Director of Dining Services Don Reed told The Dartmouth.

While paper straws are slightly more expensive for the department than plastic ones, the difference is slight enough to justify, Reed says.

Not all students at the Hanover, N.H., school are on board with the change, however, and some are reportedly hoarding straws from...

FSD Resources

Code for Asynchronous jQuery Munchkin Tracking Code