Heather Kirby, R.D.

Heather Kirby's redesign of office flow has made her a success at the Medical Center of the Rockies.

Why Selected?

According to Liz Hollowell, CDM, regional director for food, nutrition and environmental services, Heather has made an impact on foodservices by:

  • Redesigning the flow of the office while working with her team to identify the areas needing improvement
  • Working, alongside a co-leader, with chefs to develop a new menu that encompasses all therapeutic diets
  • Taking the lead in our relationship with Partnerships for a Healthier America as we move forward to provide healthier food in hospitals 

Details

Dietary Manager, Medical Center of the Rockies, Loveland, CO
Age: 28
Education: B.S. in food science and human nutrition from Colorado State University
Years at organization: 2

Get to know

Q. What has been your proudest accomplishment?

Completing my undergraduate degree and becoming a registered dietitian. 

Q. What would you say you excel at over more seasoned colleagues?

I believe that I excel at holding true to my commitments toward my employees. If I say I am going to take care of something, I always follow through. Being committed to the employees I supervise and supporting them is an achievement that I challenge myself to accomplish every day.

Q. What's the best career advice you've been given?

Always go for the unimaginable; you will never know until you try.

Q. What's been the biggest challenge you've had to overcome?

Being able to supervise different personalities and being able to lead each employee with different management styles to fit their needs.

Q. What's been your most rewarding moment?

When patients let me know that I have made a difference in their day or in their lives.

Q. What would you like to accomplish in your career in the next two years?

To continue to pursue my master’s degree in healthcare administration and management, which will enable me to be promoted.  

Q. What's been your funniest on-the-job disaster?

Rearrangement of task lists. We had people all over the place doing multiple things at once. It was a complete zoo. 

Q. What can you look back at now and laugh at?

At my first job during my first week as a dietary manager, all the cooks called in [sick], leaving me to cook for more than 200 people. This was my first encounter of cooking for so many people. At the time I was completely panicked, but it was a great learning experience.

Under 30

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