Emily Rhum

Emily Rhum is not afraid to tackle hard issues or problems.

Why Selected?

Elizabeth Poore, assistant director of operations, says: Emily is not afraid to take on new responsibilities and is first to volunteer to pilot a new project or be a test unit for a new idea or concept. She was a supervisor promoted to a unit manager in a very short time. Emily has a great attitude and work ethic and does what is necessary to make her unit a success. Emily is a confident manager and not afraid to tackle hard issues or problems. She is a true leader with her staff and has maintained their respect even though she is young in years as a manager. 

Details

Unit Manager, Ball State University, Muncie, Ind.
Age: 27
Education: B.S. in family and consumer science and hospitality and food management from Ball State University in Muncie, Ind.
Years at organization: 5

Get to know

Q. What has been your proudest accomplishment?

I would say being part of the team that opened a newly renovated food court on campus. We worked many long, busy days to open the food court and train a whole new staff, but it has been my most rewarding career experience.

Q. What would you say you excel at over more seasoned colleagues?

I would say integrating technology into our daily operations. We were the first unit to use digital menu boards and the first unit to use a paperless temperature tracking system. 

Q. What's the best career advice you've been given?

The best advice is, it’s not what you say but what people hear you say. Communicating with employees and co-workers is so important, and knowing this has made me much more aware of how we communicate with each other.

Q. What's been the biggest challenge you've had to overcome?

I put a lot of pressure on myself to do everything perfectly. It has been a hard realization, but I have come to terms with the fact that I will make mistakes and I just need to learn from them and do better next time.

Q. What's been your most rewarding moment?

My most rewarding moment was being promoted to my current position. In less than five years I progressed through every management position from student intern to unit manager.

Q. What would you like to accomplish in your career in the next two years?

I would like to be the best unit manager that I can be. I have been in my current position for just under a year and I am always learning and gaining new experiences.

Q. What's been your funniest on-the-job disaster?

We had a new fryer and our employees were learning how to filter it. We managed to overflow the filter basin not once but twice. We ran out of the chemical absorbent after the first overflow and had to use oatmeal to soak up the oil the second time.

Q. What can you look back at now and laugh at?

The number of times I obsessively checked my email when I first started as a unit manager. 

Under 30

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