Scott Shuttleworth: Game Changer

Scott Shuttleworth has accomplished a lot in a short period of time. In his two years as director of Trojan Hospitality at 33,000-student University of Southern California in Los Angeles, he has opened nine venues, with plans for several more, and has completely changed the culture of what foodservice means to the university by bringing a more commercial mindset to his department. It is expected that his new operations will increase revenue by $4 million annually. He’s been so successful that the university named him Administrator of the Year in April, an honor Shuttleworth says he is very proud of. He feels that the award shows that his department has moved the agenda forward in a very tangible way for the students of USC.

“In the private sector, you have to earn your guests,” Shuttleworth says. “I think the goal when I arrived was to impart into our organizational culture that we want to be designing and operating venues that are competitive with the private sector. I don’t believe in the philosophy of a captive audience. I believe that we have guests at the university who have choices. We need to design venues that are destinations, that are draws, that have a social dynamic, and that have a diversity of concepts, cuisines and brands that make USC a great dining option.”

And Shuttleworth has done just that with his “Restaurant Row” project. Shuttleworth has developed an area adjacent to campus and opened three full-service restaurants to cater to USC and downtown residents.

“Our goal with Restaurant Row was to add a sense of connectivity to the area and the campus,” Shuttleworth says. “Our Restaurant Row is bookended by the Radisson Hotel, which the university owns, and our new basketball arena, the Galen Center. There was an opportunity to completely reinvent three different restaurants and create a sense of contemporary style. We tend to look at everything we’re doing at USC as contributing to downtown L.A. We want to have diversity in the type of operations, just as you would in any neighborhood. We need all of these levels from grab and go to retail to cafés to restaurants to lounges. We want to make sure we have all of the above so that this district of downtown, which USC is a part of, feels just as engaged and inspired with its dining locations as it would in any other place you would live.”

The Restaurant Row restaurants are McKay’s, which features upscale American cuisine in a casual yet refined atmosphere; Rosso’s, which features New York-style pizzas, pastas and shuffleboard; and The Lab, a gastropub that features sandwiches, flatbreads, pastas, salads and beer by the beaker.

“I have only been at USC since September 2008, and together Scott and I opened McKay’s, Rosso’s and The Lab,” says Peter Kolla, associate director of operations for USC Hospitality. “Scott is very involved in every aspect of the business and truly has his finger on the pulse of all venues and events. One thing that Scott says, which will always resonate with me, is ‘earn our reputation today’ and ‘never rest on what you accomplished yesterday.’”

FoodService Director - FSD of the Month - Scott Shuttleworth - USCFood in his blood: Shuttleworth grew up in San Diego in a family of restaurant owners. His family owned three restaurants, and it was there that he first tried his hand at foodservice, beginning as a dishwasher. He graduated from USC with a B.S. in business administration, always thinking that he’d end up working in foodservice in some capacity.

“I think certain people just have a passion for this industry,” Shuttleworth says. “You have to genuinely like people and understand the hours.”

Prior to USC, Shuttleworth worked in restaurants in several capacities, most recently as director of restaurant operations for SBE Restaurant Group, where he was involved with the openings of L.A. hotspots Katsuya and The Abbey. Making the switch to university foodservice from these high-end restaurants came about in what Shuttleworth calls an unintentional way.

More From FoodService Director

Industry News & Opinion

K-12 foodservice participating in federal nutrition programs soon could fall into some extra cheese. The U.S. Department of Agriculture is set to buy 11 million pounds of cheese to raise plummeting prices, the result of a dairy glut. The acquired product will be distributed to federal nutrition programs, which might include WIC, SNAP and Child Nutrition Programs, and food banks.

The purchase falls short of a call from Congress, unions, special interest groups and commodity organizations for a $150 million buyout of dairy assets to mitigate the 35% drop in dairy revenues—a 30-year...

Ideas and Innovation
cardboard takeout box

The death knell keeps ringing for polystyrene containers. A story Monday in the Chicago Tribune reports that a man who provided free recycling for the foam products in 10 area communities is shutting down his services, citing expense and logistical difficulties, and leaving few options for diverting the material from landfills.

“From a business perspective, there is no market for [recycled polystyrene foam]. It's difficult to sell,” Beth Lang, facilities and general services manager at the Recycling Drop-Off Center in Naperville, Ill., told the Tribune. “The second reason, and more...

Industry News & Opinion

Students at Martin Luther College will be able to cook their own food in the cafeteria this year, thanks to the addition of a new self-cook station installed during the cafeteria’s renovation, The Journal reports.

In addition to the self-cook station, which contains induction cookers, the revamped cafeteria at the New Ulm, Minn., school will include new pizza equipment, a panini grill, tiled floors, poured countertops and new arrangements to make the cafeteria appear more open.

"We wanted to make it look more like a restaurant and not like a cafeteria," Director of Dining...

Industry News & Opinion

Two chefs at Whitworth University in Spokane, Wash., are trying to help solve the Mars food dilemma, myfoxspokane.com reports .

Just outside the school’s cafeteria, Executive Chef Timothy Grayson and his partner, Christine Logan-Travis, are trying their hand at growing tomatoes, oregano, basil and other plants in Martian Regolith Soil, the closest soil on Earth to that found on the fourth planet from the sun.

All of the plants in the Mars-inspired garden are intended for human consumption.

“It is a reality that at some point, if man goes to Mars, they will need to...

FSD Resources