Nona Golledge: Seeking Opportunities

“One of the things in our strategic plan that is important to us is guest services,” Golledge says. “The team observed that sustainability is important to the campus community, so it was easily included in our plan. We set goals and tried to attain them according to the budget. It’s just been amazing to see the staff really wrap their arms around that and they now make their product decisions with sustainability in mind.”

The department’s sustainability efforts were recognized by KU’s Center for Sustainability in 2008 with a Campus Leader award.

“That was a highlight because it was a team award,” Golledge says. “Every area has done something along the sustainability lines. We still have a long way to go, but we’re definitely making progress. Our goal for this year is to expand the rooftop garden and start a composting program.”

Showtime: Golledge’s team-oriented approach is most evident in the Showtime employee recognition program she started two years ago. The program is made up of 100 best practices, categorized in 10 areas such as guest services, marketing communications and food safety.

“We were seeing staff doing really great things, but we wanted to make sure that all the best practices were put together into one booklet where we could share it and set expectations across all of Dining Services,” Golledge says. “The cafés earn points for going above and beyond in any of the areas, and we have one person that keeps track of those scores so we can reward them accordingly. The program is called Showtime because when we’re serving, we say ‘it’s Showtime.’ We stick with the Showtime theme by giving the cafés ‘leading’ and ‘supporting’-role certificates each semester. Then in May we host an Academy Awards-type event where we reward the best in all the best practices categories.”

Plowing forward: One of the more recent challenges Golledge has faced, like many foodservice directors, is a reduced budget. However, Golledge and her team have found innovative ways to combat budget restraints, while still moving ahead with several projects. Budget-wise, it’s been the little things that have made a difference, according to Golledge. Little changes such as getting rid of the department’s plant service and changing service hours where there wasn’t much traffic all saved the department money. Golledge says the small changes that were made were ones that wouldn’t show a great difference in its guest services. The savings allowed the department to move forward with other projects such as a café in the new school of pharmacy being built on the university’s West Campus.

FoodService Director - FSD of the Month - Nona Golledge

“The university has a plan to see more growth on West Campus,” Golledge says. “The new pharmacy school will be over there so the university thought it was a good place to put a foodservice location. Since it is a pharmacy building, we thought it would be fun to put in an old-fashioned soda fountain. There will also be a Pulse coffee shop, a small student store, a grill and eventually a salad bar and deli. We did a survey with faculty, staff and students in the pharmacy and found out that they really wanted some options that are local, fresh, organic and healthy, so that’s going to be our focus at that location.”

Another new venture for the department is the continual development of the department’s relationship with the athletic department. Although an outside company manages concessions, KU Dining took over the catering for the 40 football suites, as well as the donor atrium in the basketball arena this year.

“We heard that the athletic department was going out for an rfp for the suites catering,” Golledge says. “Knowing that our catering department does an excellent job, we felt we would be able to provide them service at the quality they desire. That was a new adventure for us this year but an enjoyable challenge to work through.”

It is this ability to work through and overcome challenges and create a place where everyone has a say that Golledge says makes her very proud of her team.

“I think as a leader you sometimes feel like you should have all the answers,” Golledge says. “Success is about being able to rely on the expertise you have in your team. It gives me confidence to trust that they’re going to make the right move.”

Golledge has gained many fans, including her boss, Mucci, because of her ability to do just that.

“I think foodservice needs an individual who despite all this pressure can maintain a professional equilibrium,” Mucci says. “To be really successful you have to communicate with all those constituencies, and above all you’ve got to be principled and understand why you are here. I don’t think that’s an easy package to find, and Nona has been able to do all that.”

More From FoodService Director

Ideas and Innovation
staff pack

To keep staff motivated, we locked them in a room together. As part of a midsemester training session, we formed work groups and sent them to a local Escape Room to see which team could play the game together most effectively and escape first. Not only was this training a great team-building experience, but it supported a local new business and gave our staff a memorable experience.

Ideas and Innovation
star employee

Senior leadership meets twice a year to do organizational talent planning for every position from the top down. We talk about who are the potential high-performers, and go through how they can grow. People are your differentiator—you need to take care of your assets, and your assets are your human resources.

Industry News & Opinion

Students at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor will be served student-grown produce from the campus farm at dining halls this fall, M Live reports.

The dining team received its first batch of produce from UM’s on-campus farm in June, after students received the proper USDA certification to grow, harvest and deliver food to campus dining halls. In order to figure out what produce is needed, students communicate with the dining department weekly, and Michigan Dining purchases items accordingly.

"The students are involved from seed to plate," Executive Chef Frank Turchan...

Sponsored Content
college students eating

From Ovention.

Today’s colleges and universities know they should offer more than a large selection of breakfast cereals in the morning and chicken tenders at lunch to appeal to students. When it comes to what’s trending on campuses, here’s a look at what directors can tune into to boost engagement.

1. Expanded dining hours

Late-night options have long been a popular fixture on college campuses, but if it’s too late, students often choose to venture to off-campus retailers to satisfy their cravings. According to Technomic’s 2017 College & University Consumer Trend...

FSD Resources