Chris Stamm: Environment Builder

“We did not just want to feed the students, we wanted to fight the obesity problem that impacts students who don’t make healthy choices and who don’t have an opportunity to exercise and burn off the calories,” Stamm says about the importance of the partnership with the STAR program.

High school revamp: The summer foodservice fruit and salad bars and barbecues are an extension of what Stamm offers every day.

“The salad bar complements the entrée,” he says. “We do a taco day. We just give them the shell and the meat and on the salad bar we have shredded lettuce, diced tomatoes, cheese, beans, rice and fruit, salsa and ranch dressing. They build their own. We have a lot less plate waste because they are making it the way they want it. Kids usually take more pride and eat their meal better because it’s how they made it. Instead of someone giving it to them, they have choices every day.”

Other build-your-own days include pizza, sandwich, and a meat and taters day. “We do turkey and gravy, but it’s not like everyone,” Stamm says. “It’s how you present it.” For the meat and taters day, students go through the salad bar line, where they make a salad and select sides such as corn and mashed potatoes. At the end of the salad bar, foodservice employees are waiting to carve turkey roast to order.

Barbecues are offered daily at the high school. “I envision the kids sitting in class smelling the barbecue we are making,” Stamm says.

While many districts struggle to get high school students to participate in school meals, Stamm and his staff have found great success at the high school level. When Stamm first started at Paramount, around 300 lunches were served daily in the high school; now, about 2,300 lunches are served daily. Breakfast at the high school has also seen a sharp increase from approximately 30 to more than 850 served on an average day.

Participation has increased so much that Stamm had to hire more staff—34 people as opposed to 12—and there are now 24 points of service at the high school. Revenue has also increased from $3 million to $8.6 million.

“The increase is because of acceptability that this is good,” Stamm says. “What do you do to get them to eat the food? They aren’t coming for the food; they are coming because we’ve made an environment that is inviting. Everybody gets to see each other, and while they are there they get breakfast too. We play music and we changed our tables from institutional tables into small four tops and six tops. We turned it into a restaurant called the Pirate’s Den. Now before 8 o’clock you can’t even get a seat. The teachers thought the kids were going to be crazy. Instead we get compliments because the kids come into class awake.”

FoodService Director - FSD of the Month - Chris Stamm - Paramount USD

Service with a smile: Stamm also notes that the students are more apt to frequent the cafeterias because customer service has improved. “I said to the staff, ‘Let’s try being nice to them.’ I’m halfway joking, but we started training staff to realize that the students are our customers. The nicer you are to them, you are going to get that same respect back from them.”

Barraza says he has seen the change in customer service since Stamm’s arrival. “Chris’ best quality is his ability to motivate his staff so that they can understand why we are in this business. He focuses on three areas: the quality of the food we serve, the quality and ownership of the dining rooms and customer service.”

Stamm started a two-week training program at a test kitchen where the employees are taught skills ranging from grooming, food handling, safety and customer service. “They get evaluated daily so they know where they stand instead of finding out they didn’t do well at the end of training. We don’t want any surprises at the end.” 

Start the day off right: “We did a lot of lunches, especially in the elementary schools, when I first got here,” Stamm says. “The quality and service weren’t all that good, but we had a captured audience. This is a large Hispanic area, and moms stay home. I think moms want to make breakfast and walk their kids to school. I wanted to let moms know that we have a nice breakfast and a nice place for them to eat and that it’s OK to send your kids to school for breakfast.”

Stamm thought the best way to get buy-in from the mothers was to invite them to join their children for breakfast. “We started a Mother’s Day brunch to expose moms to the cafeteria,” Stamm says. An invitation is sent home with each student inviting a mother or grandmother to enjoy a complimentary breakfast on the Friday before Mother’s Day.

Following the success of the Mother’s Day brunch, Stamm started a Father’s Day brunch. “I didn’t think the dads would come so I started off with a dads and donuts thing,” Stamm says. “That wasn’t good enough, so we started a big event for them as well. I couldn’t believe how many dads came.”

More From FoodService Director

Sponsored Content
Roasted Beet Salad Pickled Blueberries
From Blueberry Council.

What’s trending in the culinary world? The basics! According to the NRA, diners today are craving authenticity, simplicity and freshness on menus. But basic ingredients don’t have to lead to boring menu options.

It’s easy to fall into the latest craze to capture consumer attention and drive sales. But we’ve learned it’s not always about novelty. Instilling a feeling of nostalgia and familiarity by using well-known and well-loved ingredients in new, experimental dishes can lead to an increase in adventurous dining decisions, while staying in your customers’...

Ideas and Innovation
lettuce dirt

Savor at McCormick Place developed the Green Thumb brand for menu items and products featuring its rooftop bounty; the latest is a pale ale made with the first crop of hops grown on the roof. Promoting that branding and the convention center’s green certification has brought in business from groups with a sustainability focus.

Ideas and Innovation
business pamphlet fair show

As we struggle to recruit and retain millennials, we had our current millennial employees invite friends who don’t work for our organization to a Q&A session where we find out why our organization is or isn’t appealing to them, and what they are looking for in an employer. I recommend doing this off-site in a casual environment so you can get honest and open feedback that could be useful for better marketing.

Menu Development
pho bowl

Achieving authenticity can be tricky. Late last year, Oberlin College landed in the news when students protested the way dining services at the Ohio school was botching ethnic food, serving up inauthentic versions of Asian and Middle Eastern dishes. It’s a challenge other operators are confronting, too, often tapping staff and patrons for inspiration.

At 260-bed Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Scottish Rite, Executive Chef Bradley Czajka, himself of Polish-Ukrainian descent, started Global Stations as a way to recognize the diversity of cultures at the hospital. “We have such an...

FSD Resources