Cavin Sullivan: Artistic Aspirations

“Before this facility was built, the company didn’t really have the space to accommodate a lot of these meetings, so they would take a lot of them off-site,” Sullivan says. “Now that we have the facilities, these meetings can stay in house, so we’ve been doing between $6,000 and $15,000 in catering sales per week.”

Employee golden rule: Sullivan is quick to point out that none of his accomplishments or successes with the new foodservice could have happened without his staff. Beth Gurdock, marketing coordinator for Metz & Associates, says Sullivan’s hands-on management style has helped him maintain good employee morale, which has translated into a low turnover rate— Sullivan says since he’s been at the Smucker Company, only three positions have turned over—and high employee satisfaction. Edwards also says he has been impressed with Sullivan’s interaction with his employees. “He is really calm and cool when talking with the staff,” Edwards says. “Most chefs and people in our industry can sort of fly off the handle when they get passionate about what they’re doing. They go a little crazy, which is how I tend to act. But whenever I see him deal with something, I always think ‘That’s not how it would have happened for me.’ It would have turned into this big ugly thing and there would have been yelling but it never turns out that way for him.”

Sullivan says his flexibility is the key to his management style.

“I take the Smucker’s philosophy and I provide my staff with a great place to work,” Sullivan says. “I think you can create a positive environment within your workforce and it just makes everything more productive. I treat them how I’d want to be treated and I find I pretty much get that in return. I think that’s why I have so little turnover, which is uncommon for our industry.”

Cavin Sullivan, FSD of the Month, fruit carvingBorn into food: Sullivan didn’t realize he was cut out for foodservice until he graduated high school. He was born in Belgium, a country with a rich culinary history, and he lived there until he was 7. Then his family moved to Akron, Ohio, where he grew up, graduating from Ellet High School. After graduation, he began his culinary career working as a fry cook at Arthur Treacher’s, a quick service restaurant chain. After working his way through several restaurants, he answered a blind ad for  a position at the Goodyear headquarters in downtown Akron.

“At Goodyear I met a great woman named Lynne Ohlson,” Sullivan says. “She recognized the artistic talent I had for presentation. She was the first person to give me garde manger books that taught me to do a lot of neat things that I still do as far as carvings with fruit and vegetables. I found I had a knack for that stuff and that is really what launched my career to the next level.”

After five years at Goodyear, Sullivan spent some time working for several foodservice management companies. One of his jobs during that period was at the National Football Hall of Fame, where his carvings of football helmets out of melons won him at least one famous fan. “Dan Marino came over to check out the Miami Dolphin melon helmet,” he adds. Sullivan also worked at healthcare and higher education accounts before settling at the Smucker Company.

“Smucker’s had a great reputation for being a very good company to work for,” says Sullivan. “They’ve really leaned on me to assist them, such as in the design of the new facility. They’ve also been very open by letting me staff in a way that provides as high a quality of foodservices as possible.”

Carving out community: Sullivan has taken his love of foodservice to the community by partnering with Heartland Point, a local community center that is part of the Smucker Company’s community education initiative partnership with the Orrville community.

“I’ve taught a few garnish classes, where I demonstrated how to make flower bouquets out of vegetables,” Sullivan says. “My next class is on melon carving so I’ll show how to carve sea creatures out of melons. It’s my way of jumping in on what Smucker’s is trying to do with the center.”

The garnish classes are illustrative of what makes Sullivan passionate about foodservice.

“The artistic aspect of foodservice is my best interest. Not that I can’t cook, but the catering, the displays and making food beautiful, as well as taste good, is what I’ve always felt I was good at.”

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