Confessions of Jeanne Fry

University of Georgia's Jeanne Fry likes a good pork tenderloin sandwich and vacations without technology devices.
Jeanne Fry, executive director of the University of Georgia Food Services, likes a good pork tenderloin sandwich and prefers a vacation spot where laptops and cell phones are nowhere to be found.

Q. What is the best part of your job?

No two days are ever the same.

Q. What is the worst part of your job?

No two days are ever the same.

Q. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?

As a dining hall assistant manager in 1994 I set a goal to be in foodservice administration in five years, and I accomplished it

Q. What is the most unusual foodservice/catering request you have ever received?

I catered an event for a large furniture company. They called it the Bed Bug Ball. They brought in miniature mattresses to use as centerpieces and thousands of plastic bugs to be used as dining and buffet table decorations. It was really creepy! 

Q. If you weren't in foodservice what would you be doing?

I would be in healthcare as I really enjoy helping people.

Q. Which living person do you most admire?

Famous people so often fall from grace, so while I do marvel at their achievements I rarely truly admire them. I do admire a dear friend. Despite debilitating health issues she works circles around everyone else and never, ever complains.

Q. What is your favorite meal?

A giant breaded pork tenderloin sandwich, Sterzing potato chips and a Diet Coke. It’s an Iowa thing!

Q. What will people always find in your refrigerator?

Miracle Whip, ketchup, eggs, butter, salsa and Diet Coke.

Q. What is the weirdest food you have ever eaten?

Pan-fried pig ears in Buffalo sauce. I thought it was too chewy, but Jigs would have loved it.

Q. What are your words to live by?

Exceed expectations—under promise and over deliver.

Q. If you had a time machine what historical event or era would you visit?

I would go to ancient Egypt during the time of the pharaohs.

Q. What would be your dream vacation?

No cell phone, no laptop, just lying on a tropical beach.

Q. If you could eat dinner with anyone living or dead, who would it be?

Vince Lombardi. He was the greatest coach of all time.

Q. What is your most treasured possession?

My five-pound yorkie, Jigs!

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