Confessions of Iraj Fernando

Bosch's Iraj Fernando loves Cadburys and hates "Iron Chef."
Iraj Fernando thinks salad bars are overrated, loves Cadbury and wants to travel to the Hayman Islands.

Q. What is the best part of your job?

The trust Southern Foodservice has given me. 

Q. What is the worst part of your job?

Specific instances when I have to explain that this is the way we do things. 

Q. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?

Overcoming obstacles with an attitude that believes that all is possible. This has allowed me to change the account’s mindset about cafeteria food. 

Q. If you weren't in foodservice what would you be doing?

A recording engineer.

Q. Which talent would you most like to have?

Empower inner city kids or lead a worldwide an organization to educate orphan kids.

Q. If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be?

I wish I could be calmer and take things slower. 

Q. What is your greatest fear?

Losing my taste buds.

Q. What is your "guilty pleasure?"

Almond Chocolate Cadburys and Little Debbie Swiss rolls.

Q. What will people always find in your refrigerator?

Rice and good craft beer.

Q. What do you consider to be the most overrated foodservice trend?

Salad bars.

Q. Read the book or see the movie?

Both.

Q. What are your words to live by?

Don’t judge people, believe in yourself and always be ready to help someone put into the actions Mother Theresa left us with.

Q. If you had a time machine what historical event or era would you visit?

Jesus in Bethlehem. 

Q. What do you value most in a friend?

Good heart, honesty and integrity.

Q. What would be your dream vacation?

A month-long trip wherever Singapore Airlines fly. To the Hayman Islands or Mali maybe. 

Q. If you could eat dinner with anyone living or dead, who would it be?

Jesus and the disciples.

Q. What is your most treasured possession?

Any crafts or drawings from my daughters.

Q. Who is your favorite celebrity chef?

Jacques Pépin

Q. What food fad do you wish had never started?

Colorful chili peppers, printed baggy chef’s pants and the "Hell’s Kitchen"/"Iron Chef" phenomenon.

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