Confessions of Harry Dorofee

Harry Dorofee thinks cupcakes are overrated and loves a classic cheeseburger.
Harry Dorofee, foodservice director for Flik International Corp. at Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton in New York, would love to meet Steve Jobs, prefers IMAX and hates rollercoasters.

Q. What is the best part of your job?

The people I am able to meet. The relationships I have made are everlasting.

Q. What is the worst part of your job?

Being surrounded by amazing food all day long and needing to limit myself. It is hard not to gain ten pounds a week.

Q. If you weren't in foodservice what would you be doing?

I would probably be a photographer or a cop.

Q. Which talent would you most like to have?

Since the Olympics just passed I think it would be amazing to run as fast as Usain Bolt.

Q. What is your greatest fear?

Roller coasters. I hate them.

Q. What is your favorite meal?

My go-to meal is always the classic cheeseburger and fries.

Q. What is your "guilty pleasure?"

Ice cream. To me, Ben and Jerry’s pints are a single-serve container.

Q. What food fad do you wish had never started?

Foams. They can be amazing if done correctly but few are able to pull them off.

Q. What is the weirdest food you have ever eaten?

I had a horse steak while in Switzerland.

Q. What do you consider to be the most overrated foodservice trend?

Cupcakes. Most of them are mediocre.

Q. Read the book or see the movie?

See the movie, in IMAX if possible.

Q. Are you a morning or evening person?

Both. I tend to not sleep a whole lot.

Q. What are your words to live by?

"We should look for someone to eat and drink with before looking for something to eat and drink." --Epicurus

Q. Who is your favorite celebrity chef?

Emeril Lagasse, he single handedly changed how people look at chefs. I believe when we look back on his career he is one of the most influential people of our times.

Q. What is your most treasured possession?

I’m not sure if I would call it treasured but I live or die with my iPhone.

Q. If you could eat dinner with anyone living or dead, who would it be?

Steve Jobs.

Q. What do you value most in a friend?


Q. If you had a time machine what historical event or era would you visit?

I would go into the future.

More From FoodService Director

Ideas and Innovation
regions hospital exterior

One of our new concepts, YumMarket, is a play off our YumPower brand that we have out in the community. We use YumPower in K-12 schools, and there’s a kiosk in a nearby minor league ballpark. We feature only better-for-you choices, such as fresh-made pizzas, sandwiches and healthy grain salads. We want people to know we are taking care of people here the same way we are in the overall community.

Ideas and Innovation
herb garden wall

In high-volume operations, few look at herb gardens as the end-all-be-all budgeting solution. But that doesn’t mean there isn’t a return on the investment. The value, operators say, is in the message herb gardens and herb walls send—that an operation uses ingredients that are fresh, sustainable and healthy. Here’s how the growing areas have paid off at three operations.

A cafeteria wall at Miles River Middle School in South Hamilton, Mass., houses three rows of hydroponic lettuce spearheaded by an interdisciplinary group of health, science, math, technology and foodservice employees...
Managing Your Business
restaurant uniforms illustration

The standard foodservice uniform has undergone a makeover. Whether to make the job more appealing or extend personality to the guest, restaurants are allowing workers to express their individuality through what they wear, from T-shirts to bandannas to hipster-style aprons. Even in more conservative operations, staff can show their personality through uniforms, now offered in a wide range of colors, fits and styles. In choosing uniforms, operators also are weighing the message their workers’ wear sends, be it one of culinary skill and expertise, or a sense of camaraderie with the community...

Ideas and Innovation
rooster illustration

Sustainability is such a priority for Santa Rosa Junior College’s culinary arts program that produce often doesn’t even hit the cooler before becoming a meal. Students quickly transform the bounty of fruits, vegetables, meat, dairy and more, harvested from the college’s own farm, into restaurant-quality dishes at the Culinary Cafe and Bakery. They learn the basics of agriculture, practice pivoting a menu based on seasonality, and compost as they cook.

It’s little wonder the program recently placed first in the CAFE/Kendall College Green Awards: This Northern California community...

FSD Resources