Whole-Wheat Pasta with Broccolini and Feta

Menu Part: 
Entree
Cuisine Type: 
Italian
Serves: 
1 cup made-to-order portions

This pasta features radishes, broccolini and feta cheese in sherry vinegar, olive oil and orange zest sauce. The use of whole-wheat pasta makes the dish heart healthy.

Ingredients

1 medium shallot, thinly sliced
1 bunch broccolini, cut into 2-in. stems and florets
1 medium bunch radishes, trimmed, very thinly sliced
12 oz. whole-wheat rigatoni
1 tbsp. sherry wine vinegar
1/2 tsp. orange zest, finely grated
3/4 tsp. kosher salt (additional to taste)
Freshly ground black pepper
3 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
7 oz. feta cheese, crumbled

Steps

1. Put shallot in bowl and cover with cold water. Soak for about 10 mins.; then drain. Bring large pot of water to boil and salt generously. Fill medium bowl with ice water and salt.

2. Add broccolini to boiling water and cook until crisp-tender, about 2 to 3 mins. Stir in radish slices and cook 30 seconds more. Use slotted spoon or strainer to scoop out vegetables and plunge them immediately into ice water. Drain vegetables and pat them very dry.

3. Add pasta to same pot of boiling water and cook, stirring occasionally until al dente, about 8 to 9 mins. Drain and set aside.

4. Whisk sherry vinegar, orange zest, ¾ tsp. salt and pepper to taste in large serving bowl. Gradually whisk in oil, starting with a few drops and then adding the rest in steady stream to make dressing.

5. Toss rigatoni, broccolini, radish and shallot with dressing. Add feta cheese and toss lightly. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Recipe by Eurest Dining Services

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