Virginia Ham Crusted Striped Bass with Warm Cabbage Slaw

Menu Part: 
Entree
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
4

An innovative way of farm raising striped bass on a soy-fed diet is making this sought-after fish more readily available and less pricey. Here, chef Lewis quickly sears the delicate fillets, adding local flavor with slices of Virginia ham. Paired with a savoy cabbage sauté and red wine reduction, the fish makes for an impressive dish.

Ingredients

Striped Bass
4 farm-raised soy-fed striped bass fillets (5 oz. each), skinned and boned
Flour for dredging
4 very thin slices Virginia ham
Clarified butter for cooking

Warm Cabbage Slaw
Olive oil, for cooking
4 oz. Spanish onion, peeled and julienned
3 to 4 garlic cloves, peeled and finely chopped
1 med. red bell pepper, seeded and julienned
1 med. green bell pepper, seeded and julienned
1 med. yellow bell pepper, seeded and julienned
1 lb. savoy cabbage, core removed and leaves julienned
Kosher salt and pepper, to taste

Red Wine Reduction
1 bottle Virginia red wine
2 tbsp. sugar

Steps

  1. Prepare fish: Dredge striped bass in flour; place ham slices on each fillet. In heavy bottom sauté pan over med. heat, heat clarified butter. Sear the fish, ham side down. Finish in the oven if necessary. Keep warm.
  2. Prepare slaw: In large sauté pan over med. heat, heat ¼ in. olive oil. Add onions; sauté until soft. Add garlic, bell peppers and cabbage.  Season with salt and pepper.  Sauté, tossing often, until vegetables begin to render their juices. Keep warm.
  3. Prepare red wine reduction: In small heavy bottom pan over med.-high heat, add red wine; reduce until volume of liquid is 1 cup. 
  4. Add sugar; continue to reduce 1 min. longer. Remove from heat; allow to come to room temperature.
  5. To plate, divide cabbage mixture equally on 4 serving plates, placing  cabbage in center. Place 1 striped bass fillet on cabbage; dot with wine reduction sauce. Serve immediately.   
Source: Photo and recipe courtesy of U.S. Soybean Export Council/United States Soybean Board

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