Vegan Summer Mushroom Ragoût

Menu Part: 
Entree
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
8 servings

This special summer mushroom ragoût is a great option for vegans who want something satisfying and comforting, with oyster and chanterelle mushrooms, an onion puree, beans and fresh vegetables.

Ingredients

Ragoût:

3 ears corn
3 qts. water
1 lb. lobster mushrooms, washed, sliced in 1/4-in. slices
8 oz. oyster mushrooms, sliced
8 oz. chanterelle mushrooms, washed, cut in half
Salt and pepper to taste
1 tsp. paprika
3 oz. olive oil
3 oz. brandy
4 oz. tomato purée

Onion Purée:
Yield: 1 qt.

2 cups water
1 cup basmati or jasmine rice
2 medium vidalia or other sweet onions, sliced thin
Kosher salt and white pepper
4 oz. extra virgin olive oil
1 qt. water to use as needed for blending

Beans:
Yield: 4 to 5 cups
1 cup navy beans, soaked overnight
1 bay leaf
Salt to taste
3 oz. olive oil
3 celery ribs, small dice
1 medium carrot, small dice
4 medium shallots, sliced
8 garlic cloves, sliced

1 cup blanched fresh or frozen peas
8 oz. string beans, blanched, cut in bite-sized pieces
Chives, chopped to finish
Parsley, chopped to finish
Chervil, chopped to finish
Tarragon, chopped to finish

Steps

1. Remove corn from cobs and cover with water. To make quick corn stock simmer for 20 mins. Remove cobs and add lobster mushrooms and simmer for 8 to 10 mins until tender.

2. In cold, large cast iron skillet, season other mushrooms with salt, pepper and paprika, add oil and bring up to medium heat and lightly caramelize mushrooms.

3. Strain and add lobster mushrooms to skillet. Save liquid. Once lobster mushrooms have begun to caramelize, add brandy and tomato. Allow to cook down and add corn. Ladle in some of simmering liquid and let braise for about 10 mins.

4. For onion purée: Boil water for rice. Add rice, return to simmer and let stand for 25 mins. until tender. Set aside. Season onions with salt and pinch of white pepper. Sweat onions in olive oil and a little water until tender. Purée onions and liquid. Add cooked rice ¼ cup at a time until consistency of heavy cream. Use more water as needed and adjust the seasoning. Set aside.

5. For beans: Soak beans in water overnight. Cover with new water and simmer with bay leaf until tender. Salt beans when finished and let stand. Sweat celery, carrots and shallots in olive oil and lightly season with salt and pepper. Drain beans and add veggies.

6. Add 3 cups of beans and onion purée to ragout a little at a time until desired consistency is reached. Note: If too thick loosen with a little of the corn stock.

7. Finish with chopped herbs, oil.

Recipe by Tufts University, Medford, Mass.

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