South Paws™ Pangasius Corn Bread Sliders with Roasted Red Peppers and Spinach

Menu Part: 
Appetizer
Cuisine Type: 
American

Hush puppy coated seafood and corn bread make the perfect appetizer or entrée. It’s the trendy upgrade from beef sliders.

Ingredients

5 pc of SouthPaws™ Striped Pangasius Fillets—cooked as per instructions on package
10 ea Corn Bread slider buns
3 ea Red Bell peppers
2 tblsp canola oil
1 lb Baby Spinach—Washed
1 ea garlic clove—minced
2 tblsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil
½ ea Lemon
Salt and Pepper to taste

Steps

  1. Coat the red peppers in the canola oil, and roast on char broiler of stove burner open flame until thin skin is blistered and black. They will look burnt, but they are not. Place charred pepper into mixing bowl and cover tight with plastic wrap. Let sit/steam for 10 minutes.
  2. After 10 minutes, remove the peppers from the bowl. Notice that the thin/charred skin peels away from the flesh of the pepper easily. With gloves, peel all the skin away from the flesh as well as the seeds and stem. Reserve cleaned peppers.
  3. Heat up a large sauté pan. When pan is hot, add extra virgin olive oil and minced garlic. Toast for about 20 seconds, add spinach, season with salt and pepper, and toss. When spinach starts to wilt, take pan off flame, and squeeze the half lemon over the spinach and let sit. The residual heat from the pan will cook the delicate spinach the rest of the way.
  4. To assemble the sandwich, open the corn bread buns in traditional sandwich form (toast bread if desired). Cut a piece of roasted pepper the same size as the bun and lay it on the bottom half. Then, using tongs, place an equal amount of the cooked spinach on top of the roasted pepper. Cut the portions of South Paws™ Striped Pangasius Fillets in half and place on top of the red pepper and spinach. Place other half of corn bread on top, and secure with toothpick. Serve.

More From FoodService Director

Ideas and Innovation
salad

We’re currently piloting a Salad Bar Happy Hour 
in Cafe 16. Due to Health Department regulations, any self-serve salad bar items must be disposed of after service. The salad bar goes “on sale” for 25 cents an ounce post-lunchtime to help reduce waste as well as offer value to customers.

Menu Development
sauces

Adding an entirely new cuisine to the menu can feel daunting. But what if you could dabble in international flavors simply by introducing a few new condiments? For inspiration, FSD talked to operators who are offering a range of condiments plucked from global regional cuisines.

“Most ethnic cuisines have some sort of sauce or condiment relishes that go with their dishes,” says Roy Sullivan, executive chef with Nutrition & Food Services at UCSF Medical Center in San Francisco. Condiments offered to diners at UCSF Medical include chimichurri (Argentina), curry (India), tzatziki (...

Ideas and Innovation
turnip juice brine

Give leftover brine new life by adding it to vegetables. In an interview with Food52, Stuart Brioza, chef and owner of State Bird Provisions in San Francisco, says that he adds a splash of leftover brine while sauteeing mushrooms to increase their flavor profile. “We like to ferment turnips at the restaurant, and it’s a great way to use that brine—though dill pickle brine would work just as well,” he says.

Menu Development
side dishes

Operators looking to increase sales of side dishes may want to focus on freshness and value. Here’s what attributes consumers say are important when picking sides.

Fresh - 73% Offered at a fair price - 72% Satisfies a craving - 64% Premium ingredients - 56% Natural ingredients - 49% Signature side - 47% Something familiar - 46% Housemade/made from scratch - 44% Something new/unique - 42% Large portion size - 42% Healthfulness - 40% Family-size - 40%

Source: Technomic’s 2017 Starters, Small Plates and Sides Consumer Trend Report , powered by Ignite

FSD Resources