Smoked Chuck Tender with Molasses-Apple Glaze

Menu Part: 
Entree
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
20 portions

Great for fall, this dish feature schuck tenders topped by a glaze made with apple juice concentrate, applesauce, brown sugar, molasses, ketchup, rice wine vinegar and butter. 

Ingredients

4 oz. hickory wood chips
1 cup apple juice
2 tbsp. + 1 tsp. salt
1⁄2 tbsp. + 1⁄2 tsp. black pepper
1 tbsp. granulated garlic
1 tbsp. + 2 tsp. granulated onion
1⁄2 tbsp. chili powder
1⁄2 tsp. ground nutmeg
41⁄4 lb. chuck tenders, silver skin removed
1⁄4 cup apple juice concentrate
1⁄2 cup applesauce
1⁄4 cup brown sugar
2 tbsp. molasses
1⁄2 cup ketchup
2 tbsp. rice wine vinegar
1 tbsp. butter

Steps

1. Preheat oven to 300˚F. Soak wood chips in apple juice for 30 minutes.

2. Mix 2 tbsp. salt, ½ tbsp. pepper, garlic, 1 tbsp. granulated onion, chili powder and nutmeg together to form seasoning mix. Rub each tender lightly with mixture. Place tenders onto baking sheet and allow to rest at room temperature for 20 to 30 minutes.

3. While beef is tempering, prepare smoker. Smoke beef for 5 to 10 minutes, depending on amount of flavor you want transferred. Remove beef from smoker and let rest for 5 minutes.

4. While beef is smoking, make glaze by putting remaining ingredients, including reserved salt, pepper and granulated onion, into small saucepan and bringing to a boil. Taste and adjust seasoning if necessary. Allow to cool slightly before using.

5. Brush glaze over chuck tenders, being sure to completely coat each tender. Place chuck tenders in preheated oven and roast for 15 to 20 minutes or until internal temperature reaches 145˚F. Remove tenders from oven and coat again with glaze. Allow to rest for 10 minutes before slicing.

Recipe by Colorado Springs School District 11, Colorado Springs, Colo.

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