Rosemary Mashed Potato Flatbread with Wisconsin Dunbarton Blue

Menu Part: 
Appetizer
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
30

A sweet onion marmalade presents a pleasant contrast to Dunbarton Blue—a blue-veined Cheddar—to create a crowd-pleasing starter.

Ingredients

Red Onion Marmalade:
3 cups red onions, thinly sliced
1 cinnamon stick
1 whole star anise
1/2 cup sugar
1 cup red wine vinegar
1 cup dry red wine
1/2 cup honey
1 teaspoon kosher salt

Rosemary-Mashed Potato Flatbread:
2 cups mashed potatoes, chilled
2 eggs
1 tablespoon fresh rosemary, finely chopped
2 teaspoons kosher salt
1 1/4 cup flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 cup butter, melted

10 ounces Wisconsin Dunbarton Blue Cheese

Steps

Make marmalade: Place onion slices in sauce pan. Add remaining ingredients and cook over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally for 20-30 minutes or until mixture is reduced to viscosity of marmalade. Cool until ready to use.

Make flatbread: Preheat oven to 375ºF. Mix mashed potatoes, eggs, rosemary and salt. In separate bowl, mix flour and baking powder. Fold flour mixture into potato mixture and mix by hand until well incorporated to form soft dough.

Dust a surface generously with flour. Turn dough out on surface and gently roll into 9-by-15-inch rectangle, 1/4-inch thick. Cut dough into 3 3-inch wide strips on the 9-inch side, yielding 3 strips, each 9-by-15 inches. Place strips on parchment-lined cookie sheet. (Dough will be fragile; gently pick up strips with spatula to transfer to sheet.) Bake 20-25 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from oven and brush strips with melted butter. Slice each strip into 1 1/2 inch long pieces (10 pieces per strip for 30 pieces total).

Meanwhile, cut Dunbarton Blue Cheese into slices to fit flatbread pieces.

Place slice of warm flatbread on serving plate. Place slice of Wisconsin Dumbarton Blue on flatbread and top with spoonful of red onion marmalade.

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