Pork Chops with Fresh Beans and Wild Mushrooms

Menu Part: 
Entree
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
6

A meal that is an epicure's delight. A delectable pork chop, tender from brining and beautifully grilled, is served on a bed of fragrant beans and mushrooms. And to top it off, a garnish of summer truffles!

Ingredients

For the brine
6-10-oz. center cut, frenched pork rib chops
1 tsp. whole juniper berries
1 tsp. whole allspice
1⁄3 cup kosher salt
1⁄3 cup sugar
1 carrot, coarsely chopped
1 rib celery, coarsely chopped
1 small Spanish onion, peeled and coarsely chopped
3 cloves garlic, sliced
1 spring fresh thyme
1 bay leaf
8 cups cold water

Shell bean ragoût:
1⁄2 lb. fresh shell beans, removed from pod (any combination of cranberry, lima, soy, blackeyed peas or crowder beans)
2 shallots, peeled and sliced
1⁄2 lb. haricot verts, snapped
3⁄4 lb. chanterelles, trimmed, sliced
1 tbsp. + 1 tsp. unsalted butter
1 sprig fresh thyme
1⁄2 tsp. tarragon, chopped
1⁄2 tsp. chives, chopped
1 tbsp. water
1 tsp. pure olive oil
Salt and pepper

For cèpe vinaigrette:
2 cups rich chicken stock
1⁄2 cup dried cèpes
1 cup red wine
1 shallot, minced
1⁄2 tsp. fresh thyme leaves
1⁄2 cup extra virgin olive oil
1⁄2 cup sherry vinegar

 

Steps

1. Combine cold water, salt, and sugar. Stir until dissolved. Add remaining ingredients, cover and refrigerate 18-24 hours. Remove chops from brine; refrigerate until ready to grill.

Shell bean ragoût:

1. Combine shell beans, olive oil and enough water to just cover in a saucepot, season. Simmer 6-8 min; drain, cool.

2. Melt 1 tsp. butter in skillet over medium heat. Add shallots and caramelize, stirring often. Remove from pan; cool.

3. In skillet over medium-high heat, melt 1 tbsp. butter. Add chanterelles and thyme. After 3 min., add water; cook until skillet is dry; cool mushrooms. Combine beans, shallot, and chanterelles. Add herbs; adjust seasonings and refrigerate.
 

For cèpe vinaigrette:

1. Combine red wine and cèpes in a small saucepan. Reduce by half. Add chicken stock and reduce so liquid equals 1 cup. Strain and reserve cèpes; cool to room temperature. Combine shallot, thyme, and sherry vinegar in bowl. Whisk in olive oil and cèpe reduction. Season; set aside.

To assemble dish:
1. Grill pork chops to medium. Warm beans with a splash of water. Adjust seasonings; divide between 6 plates. Top beans with pork chop. Barely warm vinaigrette, emulsifying with 1 tsp. unsalted butter. Drizzle chops with vinaigrette; garnish with summer truffles.
 

Source: Recipe from Chef Paul Kahan

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