Mango Coconut Custard Ice Cream

Serves: 
8

Coconut milk imparts a touch of the exotic in this ice cream. Serve the dessert in a coconut shell for an impressive presentation.

Ingredients

2 cans (13.5-oz. each) Thai coconut milk
1/4 tsp. sea salt
1 cup granulated sugar
9 egg yolks
1 1/2 tsp. coconut flavor (extract)
1 cup heavy whipping cream
16 oz. mango puree
Toasted coconut shavings, for garnish

Steps

  1. Combine coconut milk and salt in saucepan over med. heat. Cook until mixture is just below simmer. Cover and set aside.
  2. Combine sugar and egg yolks in food processor; blend until smooth. With machine running, add hot coconut milk. Return mixture to saucepan. 
  3. Cook, stirring constantly, until mixture thickens slightly but does not simmer.
  4. Remove pan from heat; transfer to bowl. Stir in coconut flavor; set over ice to cool quickly. Cover and refrigerate until chilled.
  5. Whip cream to soft peaks; fold into chilled custard. 
  6. Transfer mixture to ice cream maker and freeze according to manufacturer’s instructions until partially frozen. Fold in mango puree until streaked but not blended; freeze until completely firm.
  7. For service: Scoop ice cream into coconut shells or dessert dishes; garnish with toasted coconut shavings.
Source: Culinary Visions Panel, Olson Communications

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