Florida Citrus and Vodka-Cured Salmon with Florida Orange and Beet Vinaigrette

Menu Part: 
Entree
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
6

Tantalize Taste Buds with Flavors from Under the Sea. Customers will indulge in savory vodka-cured salmon paired with zesty vinaigrette for an expertly crafted colorful cuisine.

Ingredients

2 pounds salmon fillet, center cut, skin on, no bones
2 tablespoons Florida orange zest
2 tablespoons fresh thyme
2 teaspoons Florida grapefruit zest
¼ cup Florida orange juice
3 tablespoons Florida grapefruit juice
2 tablespoons vodka
2 cups salt
1 cup sugar

Florida Orange and Beet Vinaigrette:
2 beets, peeled
1 cup Florida orange juice
¼ cup sherry vinegar

Garnish:
2 cups watercress, leaves only
Crackers, optional

Steps

Place salmon in a nonreactive casserole dish. Spread Florida orange zest, thyme, and Florida grapefruit zest evenly over salmon; sprinkle with Florida orange and grapefruit juices and vodka. Combine salt and sugar; cover flesh side of salmon with salt mixture. Cover and refrigerate for 4 to 5 hours, depending on thickness of fillet (longer for thicker fillets, less time for thinner fillets).

While salmon is curing, prepare Florida Orange Beet Vinaigrette: Grate beets finely with a grater. Wrap grated beets in cheesecloth; squeeze juice from beets into a bowl. Reserve juice; discard beet pulp. Place beet juice in saucepan; add Florida orange juice and sherry vinegar. Stir to combine; bring mixture to a simmer; simmer until volume is reduced by two-thirds. Chill and reserve.

Remove salmon from refrigerator and rinse under cold water to remove salt mixture; pat salmon dry with paper towels. Remove skin and any dark flesh; cut salmon into thin slices. To serve, place 4 to 5 salmon slices salmon on each plate. Drizzle with Florida Orange and Beet Vinaigrette. Garnish with watercress leaves; serve with crackers, if desired.

Additional Tips

Additional Tips

Serve with The Floridian.

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