Chicken Pot Pies

Menu Part: 
Cuisine Type: 

Just like Mom used to make, this chicken pot pie is great comfort food. Poached chicken and sauteed vegetables are mixed in a rich velouté sauce, covered with pie crust and baked.


2 med. carrots, julienned
2 bulbs fennel, julienned
4 ribs of celery, sliced
6 garlic cloves, chopped
1 yellow onion, julienned
Butter for sautéing
Salt and pepper, to taste
3-4 lb. chicken
Chicken stock or water

4 oz. butter
1 cup flour
1 qt. chicken stock
1 qt. heavy cream
2 tbsp. chopped parsley
1 tbsp. chopped chives
Salt, pepper, and herbs, to taste

Pot Pie Pastry:
3 cups flour
12 oz. butter or shortening
1 cup ice water
Egg wash


1. Prepare Filling: Sauté the carrots, fennel, celery, garlic, and onion in butter until caramelized. Season with salt and pepper; set aside.

2. Poach chicken in chicken stock or water seasoned with salt and pepper; cool in liquid. Remove cooled chicken and cut meat from bones.

3. Prepare Velouté: In saucepan, melt butter. Stir in flour and cook, stirring, 3-4 min. until the roux gives off a nutty aroma. Stir in stock and cream. Whisk until sauce begins to boil. Season with salt, pepper, and herbs.

4. Prepare Pastry: In mixer beat flour and butter until it forms pea-sized pieces of dough. Gradually add water and mix until dough comes together. Refrig_erate until firm.

5. Preheat oven to 400°F. Divide dough into six 3-oz. balls. Roll out each ball on a floured surface to a circle large enough to cover an individual round ramekin.

6. Mix cooked chicken and vegetables into velouté. Fill 6 ramekins with filling mixture. Cover with pastry and crimp edges. Brush with egg wash.

7. Bake pot pies 20-30 min. until golden.

Source: Recipe from Chef Jon Buchanan

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