The next big global breakfast grub

Published in FSD Update

By 
Lizzy Freier, Technomic Menu Analysis Managing Editor

shakshuka egg tomato

Shakshuka is a North African dish showing similar growth to two other items hailing from this region: harissa and chermoula sauces. Increasing 6.3% on menus over the last year, according to Technomic’s MenuMonitor, shakshuka is made with ingredients that are commonly stocked in U.S. kitchens and are familiar to an American audience. The global morning grub traditionally features eggs cooked in a thick, spicy sauce of tomatoes, peppers, onions, garlic and seasonings, although some U.S. operators are now adding their own interpretations to this offering.

The dish directly appeals to the more than half of millennials (51%) and two in five Gen Zers (43%) who want to see more ethnic items served at breakfast, according to Technomic’s Breakfast Consumer Trend Report. Plus, its moderate heat level appeals to a majority of consumers.

Several emerging restaurant chains have recently rolled out their own versions of shakshuka. Here’s a few:

  • Argo Tea's Roasted Tomato & Ham Shakshuka with Swiss cheese, spinach, croissant pieces and pebre salsa, and Red Pepper & Feta Shakshuka with spinach, croissant pieces and a drizzle of pesto
  • Wildflower Bread Company’s Shakshuka Bowl with eggs served over tomatoes, peppers, onions, feta, spices and cilantro
  • Snap Kitchen's Shakshuka vegetables in tomato sauce topped with an over-easy egg

Independents are also debuting twists on classic shakshuka recipes. Adaptations include:

  • Nanoosh’s Taverna Tuna Sandwich with shakshuka spread, a traditional sandwich with a shakshuka-inspired spread (New York City)
  • V Street’s Piri Piri Tofu “Shakshouka” with zhoug avocado toast, long hots and spiced tomato stew, a deconstructed vegan version (Philadelphia)
  • Jack’s Wife Freda’s Green Shakshuka featuring the standard recipe of two baked eggs in a tomato sauce, but Latin additions of tomatillos, green peppers and cilantro turn the standard red sauce green for an atypical pop of color (New York City)

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