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Published in FSD Update

Staff changes underway at FoodService Director.

Well, one of my favorite Lindsey work stories could be considered a minor on-the-job disaster. Lindsey was leaving a voicemail for a source, asking her to return her call. I had heard Lindsey leave a voicemail similar to this one thousands of times before. But for some reason she went blank in the middle of the message. It went something like this:

“Hi Patricia, my name is Lindsey Ramsey and I’m an editor with FoodService Director magazine. I’m working on a story about c-stores and I’d love to talk with you about your operation. Please call me back at…”

And that’s where the trouble came in. I could hear the hesitation in Lindsey’s voice. After a few seconds she turned to me (our desks faced back to back) and said, “What’s my number again?” and we both lost it in a fit of laughter.

Although it’s not a true disaster, it was pretty funny. So I’d like to thank Lindsey for all the years of laughs and I look forward to the many more we’ll share.

Speaking of on-the-job disasters and our Under 30 recognition, it’s time for you to send in your nominations. Tell us why your employee is a rising star in the industry and maybe we’ll be able to share his/her funniest on-the-job disaster. You can send in your nominations forms to bschilling@cspnet.com.

Here’s one of our best stories from a past Under 30 recipient, to whet your appetite. This one comes from Matthew Vasquez, general manager with Eurest Dining Services at Lowe’s.

“When we have a bad ice storm in the mountains our team sets up service tents for a client, which usually feeds up to 1,500 workers. We had this ice storm where we only served 300 of our 1,500 expected guests. We found a shelter to donate the extra food, so I hauled it down there. The food shifted and we spilled about 30 gallons of beef stew all over the cargo area of the truck. With temperature at 20°F, the soup turned into a slippery mess. We had to clean out the truck with mops and hoses and with our lack of sleep and the slickness of the floor, we could not stand up in the truck. As we tried to clean we fell over and couldn’t stop laughing at the situation.”  

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