Palm scanners at odds with the Bible?

Some devout Christians are challenging technology as being the work of the devil.

I read a story over the weekend which reported on an interesting objection to the use of technology in school cafeterias. According to the report, which comes from kplctv.com, parents of students attending Moss Bluff Elementary School in Lake Charles, La., are up in arms over the proposed use of a palm vein scanner to check kids through the cafeteria line.

Principal Charles Calderera says the use of the scanner, which reads the veins in a person’s hand to identify them, is becoming necessary as the school district grows. He told KPLC News that the technology would make the foodservice program more efficient and less prone to errors. He added that the school’s foodservice director, Patricia Hoseman advocated its use after parents began complaining that they were being charged for meals even though their children weren’t going through the serving line.

But, according to KPLC, some parents are opposed to the plan—on religious grounds. Principal Calderera noted that parents were told in a letter that they have the right not to allow their children to be scanned. The KPLC article quoted only one parent, who said she not only would block her child from such technology, she would transfer him or her to another school.

I must confess that, after reading several blogs on this topic and perusing several Biblical references, I’m at a loss as to how palm scanning, or any other type of biometric identification, has anything to do with the devil, which is what these conscientious objectors are complaining about. I have read several references to “the mark of the beast,” apparently referring to a passage in Revelation in which the predicted “second beast” causes all people to have a mark placed on their hands. Are these people suggesting that the “beast” placed the veins in our hand that the scanner reads? (For the record, I also find it interesting that they are using the Internet to make their message go viral.)

Whenever something is written as cryptically as the Bible is, people will find a way to read into it whatever they want. No amount of debate is going to change their minds. For all I know, they may be right. But if their goal is to keep this type of technology out of schools, the workplace and other aspects of our lives, they might want to consider joining forces with those people who believe this is a conspiracy from a government hell-bent on controlling our lives. At least they’d have strength in numbers.

Keywords: 
technology

More From FoodService Director

Ideas and Innovation
trail mix

We’ve added fueling stations in our units for our workers who didn’t have time to eat or just need a snack. We have areas set up with trail mix, crackers, cookies and water. It helps us avoid people feeling or getting ill, especially when we get closer to exam periods and student workers are studying and not taking the time to eat.

Ideas and Innovation
reusable coffee cup thermos

We were inspired by a book titled “Influence” to start a sustainable cup program called My Cup. All 15,000 new students receive a reusable cup with their name on it, which they can use at the dining halls. Personalizing helps them invest in the program and actually use it.

Menu Development
quinoa bowl

In a time of growing health consciousness, it might not be enough anymore for food to be merely filling. According to Technomic’s 2016 Healthy Eating Consumer Trend Report , diners are looking for food with a function, such as those with high protein content, immunity-boosting properties, antioxidants, probiotics and more. The data suggests 63% of consumers see these foods as healthier than those without any specific nutritional function—and would be more likely to buy them.

But are those stated preferences translating on an operational level? There, the answer is less clear. Baby...

Ideas and Innovation
phone bed call sick

We make people call and directly talk to their boss or supervisor if they are reporting an absence for a shift. While it is more cumbersome, it is a conscious decision. We have adapted and implemented electronic methods to obtain efficiencies in just about every other functional area, except for electronic absence reporting systems. The direct supervisor can put more pressure on an employee to show up—especially those with some form of the “Super Bowl plague”—than any electronic system can.

FSD Resources