School Nutrition Association retains new legislative counsel

Barnes & Thornburg LLP replaces Marshall Matz's firm after more than 30 years.

July 3 — The School Nutrition Association (SNA) announced that it has retained the services of Barnes & Thornburg LLP for its advocacy and legislative services.  The change is effective immediately. SNA was previously represented by Olsson Frank Weeda Terman Matz PC.
“In light of the historic regulatory challenges facing school nutrition professionals and with Child Nutrition Reauthorization on the horizon, SNA’s board of directors agreed that it was an ideal time for SNA to reflect on its advocacy strategies,” said SNA President Sandra Ford in a news release.  Last year, the U. S. Department of Agriculture issued the first update to school meal pattern regulations in more than 15 years. Last month, the department released the first-ever regulations for competitive foods sold in school vending machines and a la carte lines.
Ford explained that SNA considered several proposals from leading Washington, D.C.—based advocacy firms.  A selection committee comprised of SNA board members, SNA’s CEO and Staff Vice President of Child Nutrition and Policy reviewed each proposal, conducted interviews with prospective firms, and determined that Barnes & Thornburg LLP’s vision offers the best match for SNA’s advocacy goals at this time.

“[SNA] extends our deepest thanks and appreciation to Marshall Matz for more than 30 years of dedicated service to SNA and its members,” said Ford in a news release.  “Marshall’s work on behalf of SNA has strengthened school nutrition programs for the millions of children who rely on healthy school meals.”
Barnes & Thornburg LLP is one of the nation’s 100 largest full-service law firms with offices in 12 cities.  The Washington, D.C. office specializes in government relations.  Partners from the firm will attend SNA’s 67th Annual National Conference (ANC) in Kansas City, Mo., July 14-17 to meet SNA members, participate in conference events and engage in legislative planning discussions with SNA’s board of directors and the Public Policy and Legislation Committee.

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