Notre Dame's David Prentkowski dies

Director was 55.

Aug. 13—David R. Prentkowski, longtime director of food services at the University of Notre Dame, died Aug. 9 in a drowning accident that also claimed the life of his 18-month-old granddaughter, Charlotte.

Prentkowski and his granddaughter were found in the pool at his home. Authorities have yet to disclose how they drowned.

Prentkowski had served as director at Notre Dame since 1990. Earlier he served as director of food services at the University of Utah and the University of Michigan. He was an active member of the National Association of College and University Food Services (NACUFS). He served as president of the association from 1996-1997. Earlier this year NACUFS named its Distinguished Service Award for Prentkowski, and he was on hand to present the award at the national conference to Michael Rice. Prentkowski was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer last fall and had served as honorary chairperson of Notre Dame's 2012 Relay for Life.

“Dave and Charlotte’s tragic deaths are a shocking and heartbreaking loss,” Rev. John I. Jenkins, C.S.C., Notre Dame’s president, said in a university press release. “Dave’s energy, devotion and courage will continue to inspire the Notre Dame family even as his death and the Prentkowski family’s grief are in our prayers.”

Prentkowski is survived by his wife, Wanda, three daughters, Mara (Matt) Kaiser, Erica Prentkowski and Andra Prentkowski; and one son, Nicholas Prentkowski.

Contributions in memory of Prentkowski may be made to the American Cancer Society or to the Center for Hospice Care.

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