NACUFS names new executive director

Gretchen Couraud comes to NACUFS with more than 25 years of nonprofit and association management experience.

July 24—The National Association of College & University Food Services (NACUFS) has named Gretchen Couraud, CAE, CFRE, as its next executive director, effective Nov. 1. Couraud is the third executive director in the association’s 54-year history, and its first female chief staff executive. She will succeed Joseph Spina, CAE, Ph.D., who is retiring after 22 years of service to the association.

Couraud comes to NACUFS after more than 25 years in nonprofit and association management, with extensive experience in government relations, issue advocacy, strategic planning and organizational leadership. She is currently the executive director for the Michigan Library Association (MLA), a position she has held for the past seven years.

Prior to joining the MLA, Couraud held positions at theCapital Area Humane Society, Lansing Community College Foundation and Lansing Regional Chamber of Commerce in Michigan, as well as the U.S. Chamber of Commerce in Chicago. She is a graduate of Goucher College with a B.A. in international relations and management. Couraud received her Certified Association Executive (CAE) credential in 1990 and has been a Certified Fund Raising Executive (CFRE) since 2006. She also serves on the board of directors for the Michigan Society of Association Executives.

“I’m pleased with the thorough approach taken by the board of directors and search committee in selecting Gretchen as the association’s next executive director,” Nona Golledge, NACUFS past president and director of KU Dining at the University of Kansas, said in a press release. “Gretchen will provide the leadership necessary to build upon the dynamic programs established during Dr. Spina’s tenure as executive director. NACUFS is in great hands.”

Dr. Spina will stay on as executive director emeritus through the end of the year to help ensure a smooth organizational transition. Timothy Dietzler, NACUFS president and director of dining services at Villanova University, will facilitate the transition.

“Because dining services is such a vital element of student life, I am excited to join an organization that is dedicated to the success of college and university foodservice programs,” Couraud said in the release. “I look forward to working with the association’s board, volunteers, members and staff to advance the mission of the organization and elevate the image of collegiate foodservice on campus, as well as that of NACUFS itself.”

More From FoodService Director

Industry News & Opinion
k-12

The School Nutrition Foundation —the School Nutrition Association’s philanthropic sibling—and Share Our Strength’s No Kid Hungry campaign have partnered to launch an initiative called Schools as Nutrition Hubs.

“No Kid Hungry really sees schools as a critical place in the fight against childhood hunger,” says Laura Hatch, director of national partnerships for No Kid Hungry. “Schools are really a no-brainer because they have the infrastructure, they have the experience, it’s a trusted place for families. And being able to maximize their programs and maximize the federal...

Ideas and Innovation
walk-in cooler

The walk-in cooler can serve as a gathering place for more than just produce. When temperatures rise, staff at Empire State South restaurant in Atlanta host meetings in the walk-in and make occasional trips to hang out throughout the day to beat the back-of-house heat.

Menu Development
college students eating

Taste may reign supreme when college students choose their next snack, but operators should also pay attention to factors such as price and portion size. Here are the most important attributes students consider when choosing snacks, according to Technomic’s 2017 College and University Consumer Trend Report .

Taste: 78%

Ability to satisfy my appetite between meals: 67%

Price: 64%

Portion size: 54%

Familiarity: 46%

Overall nutrition value: 40%

Protein content: 36%

All-natural ingredients: 29%

Fiber content: 27%

...

Managing Your Business
student shame
“We allow students to charge meals at all levels; even in high school, they can charge a certain number of meals. [After that is met,] they are given an alternate meal,” Sharon Glosson, executive director of school nutrition services for North East Independent School District, says. Elementary students can charge up to $15 of meals; middle schoolers can charge $10; and high schoolers can charge $5. “Ultimately, [food services is] carrying out the policy but we’re not necessarily the creators of the policy, or have the final say on the policy, because that budget decision has to be made by the...

FSD Resources