Harvard's Undergraduate Council proposes to keep dining halls open during spring break

CAMBRIDGE, Mass.—Members of the Undergraduate Council’s Student Life Committee met with officials from Harvard University Dining Services on Feb. 28 to discuss plans to keep the dining halls open during spring break next week.

“Since our last meeting with HUDS last semester, we have been asking for dining halls to be open during spring break,” vice chair of the Student Life Committee Happy Yang ’16 said.

She said that though HUDS does not plan to offer dining hall service during spring break this year, HUDS staff members are considering plans to do so next year and have brought a financial modeling plan to the Office of Student Life.

The College’s meal plan currently does not include dining hall access over spring break, leading many students who are unable or choose not to leave campus during break to purchase food in the Square and the surrounding area with their personal money.

“I’m staying because I can’t go back to my country [during the break],” said Kelvin N. Muriuki ’17, who is originally from Kenya. “It’s going to be a little tricky getting food, but I have been working, so I’m going to use my savings.”

Members of some athletic teams, who stay on campus for training, receive a stipend for meals over the break, as per regulations from the National Collegiate Athletic Association for student-athletes who stay on campus for training.

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