Guckenheimer cafes recognized for sustainability and nutrition practices

Cafes are first corporate locations to be certified by the US. Healthful Food Council.

June 13—Four Guckenheimer cafes have achieved REAL Certification by the United States Healthful Food Council (USHFC).These cafes are the first corporate locations to be certified by the organization. The announcement of the certification, which concludes a six-month pilot program, was revealed at the first annual Menus of Change leadership summit, co-presented by The Culinary Institute of America and Harvard School of Public Health in Boston.

USHFC's Responsible Epicurean and Agricultural Leadership (REAL) Certification, began as an assurance of nutrition and sustainability best practices in restaurants. These new REAL Certified locations mark the expansion of the program nationally, as well as with foodservice vendors running café operations within corporations, universities, hotels, senior living facilities, event centers and more.

The four inaugural contract foodservice facilities to become REAL Certified are:

Blue Glass Café, John Hancock Building, Boston
Café Hive, The Clorox Company, Pleasanton, Calif.
W6 Café, Google, San Francisco
Union Pacific Café, Union Pacific, Omaha, Neb.

The pilot program began in December 2012 as Guckenheimer collaborated with accounts to undergo USHFC review. Using a flexible points-based model similar to the LEED green building standard, USHFC's registered dietitians audited the cafés across a range of criteria such as the use of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, healthful cooking and preparation methods, moderate portion sizes, as well as behavioral components that encourage better for you choices and sustainable practices for food sourcing.

"We thank USHFC's bold efforts and the dedicated individuals at each account who have worked to make this certification a reality," Randall Boyd, Guckenheimer CEO, said in a press release. "The shift to nutrition-centric food at work has tremendous impact for businesses that we are just beginning to quantify. We are at the tipping point where data will verify that employee health and productivity are inextricably linked, and food preparation, as well as its presentation, is a large component of that cycle. Guckenheimer's core offering aligns with USHFC's objectives and the foodservice industry should be ready to rise to the occasion. 

More From FoodService Director

Ideas and Innovation
trail mix

We’ve added fueling stations in our units for our workers who didn’t have time to eat or just need a snack. We have areas set up with trail mix, crackers, cookies and water. It helps us avoid people feeling or getting ill, especially when we get closer to exam periods and student workers are studying and not taking the time to eat.

Ideas and Innovation
reusable coffee cup thermos

We were inspired by a book titled “Influence” to start a sustainable cup program called My Cup. All 15,000 new students receive a reusable cup with their name on it, which they can use at the dining halls. Personalizing helps them invest in the program and actually use it.

Menu Development
quinoa bowl

In a time of growing health consciousness, it might not be enough anymore for food to be merely filling. According to Technomic’s 2016 Healthy Eating Consumer Trend Report , diners are looking for food with a function, such as those with high protein content, immunity-boosting properties, antioxidants, probiotics and more. The data suggests 63% of consumers see these foods as healthier than those without any specific nutritional function—and would be more likely to buy them.

But are those stated preferences translating on an operational level? There, the answer is less clear. Baby...

Ideas and Innovation
phone bed call sick

We make people call and directly talk to their boss or supervisor if they are reporting an absence for a shift. While it is more cumbersome, it is a conscious decision. We have adapted and implemented electronic methods to obtain efficiencies in just about every other functional area, except for electronic absence reporting systems. The direct supervisor can put more pressure on an employee to show up—especially those with some form of the “Super Bowl plague”—than any electronic system can.

FSD Resources