Food Channel predicts top 10 dessert trends for 2011

May 26—The Food Channel has released its Top Ten Dessert Trends for 2011. From cupcakes and floral to raw, find out which trends make the list.

1. The next cupcake is…—the cupcake movement is more around its evolution than its dissolution

2. Sweet, heat, salt and tart—desserts don’t always have to be sugary sweet

3. Wedding cake off the guest list—an overall trend toward a more casual, and less stuffy, lifestyle

4. Behold the power of protein—people are looking for more than a sugar buzz from desserts today

5. Desserts for grown-ups—the maturing of America’s sweet tool

6. Whole grains and no grains—a food trend that’s all about health

7. Desserts in the raw—the demand for foods, desserts included, that are far less processed

8. A touch of sweetness all day long—sweet rewards that help get us through the day

9. A hint of floral—subtle hints of floral have begun to sprout up in the dessert category

10. Dessert theatrics—enjoying a little tableside theatre when we’re enjoying a nice restaurant dinner

11. (Bonus) The end of shareable—going in with the same spoon for bite after bite has gotten old

“When we took a look at how people are consuming dessert, one thing became clear: our tastes our evolving and becoming more evolved,” said Kay Logsdon, editor of The Food Channel. “We see society trending toward a more casual—and less stuffy—lifestyle. On one hand, we demand less processed foods and cleaner labels, but we still allow ourselves to indulge in sweet little rewards that get us through the day.”

The Top Ten Dessert Trends for 2011 was a partnership between The Food Channel, CultureWaves and Mintel International.

To read more, visit The Food Channel.

 

 

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