Flik Schools division wins grand prize from Whole Grains Council

Dec. 2— Flik Independent School Dining, a division of Compass Group, was awarded the grand prize as part of the Whole Grains Council’s 4th annual Whole Grains Challenge. The quality of this year's entries was so high that, according to the Whole Grains Council, for only the second time a grand prize was awarded and there was a tie for first place.

The Whole Grains Challenge recognizes chefs, dining directors and foodservice operator who bring whole grains to the center of the plate. Flik Independent School Dining, based in Rye Brook, N.Y., serves more than 120 schools with its Eat. Learn. Live. program. This year, Flik made the Whole Grains Challenge part of its Be-A-Star initiative, designed to recognize unit directors and their staff for nutritionally balanced meal planning.

Several other non-commerical operators were honored as part of the challenge, including Holton Public Schools, Holton, Mich.; The Abbey Food Service Group, Enosburg Falls, Vt.; Eurest Dining Services at American Express, New York; Jewish Theological Seminary, New York; Sodexo at George Mason University, Fairfax, Va.; The Park School, Brooklandville, Md.; and The Village Community School, New York. The Maine School of Science and Math, Limestone, Maine, and Episcopal High School, Alexandria, Va., received honorable mentions.

"Whole grains have increasingly become the norm—the default—everywhere you look," Cynthia Harriman, director of food and nutrition strategies for the Whole Grains Council and for Oldways, its parent organization, said in a press release. “Nothing illustrates this better than the pioneers and pace-setters who enter the Whole Grains Challenge. Each year the whole-grain offerings become more creative, the promotions are more eye-catching, and time after time, we're proud to showcase the many ways nutrition and great taste can be united on a menu."

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