Association of Nutrition & Foodservice Professionals names CEO

Joyce Gilbert to replace Bill St. John, who retires May 31.

Feb. 25—The Association of Nutrition & Foodservice Professionals has chosen Joyce Gilbert, Ph.D., R.D., as its new president and CEO.  Dr. Gilbert replaces Bill St. John, who retires May 31.

According to ANFP, Gilbert has vast experience as a chief executive, fundraiser, clinician, and instructor for a variety of organizations. She has served for the past five years as executive director of the Marilyn Magaram Center, a non-profit foundation based at California State University, Northridge, that focuses on research and education in food and nutrition. In that position she has directed fundraising programs that have generated more than $6.1 million. 

From 1995 to 2001, Gilbert worked for Compass Group North America after selling her consulting practice to the contract food management firm. Gilbert’s own nutrition consulting company provided expertise in regulatory compliance to the long-term healthcare industry, and nutrition consultancy services to women, athletes, and healthcare continuing education providers.

Gilbert earned her bachelor’s degree in biology from the University of South Carolina, her master’s in human nutrition from Clemson University, and her doctorate in food science and human nutrition from the University of Florida. She is an active member of many professional associations, among them the American Society of Nutrition, the Institute of Food Technology, and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, along with several of their practice groups. 

Gilbert is a published author on several topics, including nutrition and diet therapy, CMS regulations, sports nutrition, ideal weight, and many more. 

“The [certified dietary manager] is the cornerstone of the dietetics profession,” Gilbert said in a statement from ANFP. “Together we will continue to build the value of the CDM credential through empowering our members. I am both honored and excited about our future and my service to this incredible association.”

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