The 2011 Hennessy/Hill Awards presented at NRA Show

June 2—The winners of the 2011 John L. Hennessy and W.P.T. Hill Memorial Awards, which recognize innovations in military foodservice, were announced at the NRA Show in Chicago.

The Hennessy Awards go to U.S. Air Force operations and the Major General W.P.T. Hill Awards are given to U.S. Marine Corps operations. Awards were presented in several categories. Honorees were recognized at a breakfast on the opening day of the show.

The Hennessey Award winners were:
• Multiple Facility Base: Hurlburt Field, Fla.
• Single Facility Base: Kirtland Air Force Base, N.M.
• AFGSC Best in Missile Feeding Operations: 91st Space Wing, Minot Air Force Base, N.D.
• USAFE Food Service Small Site Award: 702nd Munitions Support Squadron, Buechel Air Base, Germany.

This Hill Award winners were:
• Best Military/Contractor Garrison Mess Hall: Mess Hall 1223, Camp Kinser, Marine Corps Base, Camp S.D. Butler, Okinawa, Japan.
• Best Reserve Field Mess: HQSVCo, 6th ESB, 4th MLG, Portland, Ore.
• Best Food Service Contracted Garrison Mess Hall: Mess Hall 1660, MAGTF-TC, 29 Palms, Calif., managed by Sodexo
• Best Active Field Mess: CLR 27, 2nd MLG, II MEF, Camp Lejeune, N.C.

The Hennessy Travelers’ Association Award of Excellence was also presented at the breakfast. The award honors airmen who exemplify the highest standards of professionalism, attitude and culinary skill. This year’s winners were:

• Multiple Facility: SRA Melissa R. Caballero, Barksdale Air Force Base, La.
• Single Facility: A1C Rebecca A. LaBelle, Davis-Monthan Air force Bases, Ariz.

In addition, the NRA also presented the first Arthur J. Myers Award for Foodservice Excellence, which recognizes professionalism, attitude, commitment to service, culinary skill, team spirit and leadership qualities.

This year’s winners were A1C Jeffrey L. Peoples, Hurlburt Field, Fla., and A1C Kevin J. Pordon, RAF Mildenhall, United Kingdom.

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