20 Most Influential: Jamie Harvie, Institute for a Sustainable Future & Healthy Food in Health Care

Harvie created Healthy Food in Health Care, an initiative developed to help hospitals make the connection between health and the foods being served.

Jamie Harvie
Executive Director, Institute for a Sustainable Future;
Founder, Healthy Food in Health Care,
Duluth, Minn.

Hospitals should be bastions of healthy eating behaviors. The notion seems simple, but in reality that wasn’t necessarily happening, according to Jamie Harvie. In 2005 Harvie created Healthy Food in Health Care, an initiative developed with Health Care Without Harm, that helps hospitals make the connection between the health of patients, staff and the community and the foods being served. In 2006, the Healthy Food in Health Care Pledge was launched. Hundreds of hospitals have signed on, promising to make changes in the way they procure foods. For example, in a 2011 survey of operators who have signed the pledge, 94% of respondents served local foods or beverages in 2010 and 80% purchased sustainable dairy products.

Harvie’s work focuses on creating a community. The pledge did that by establishing a network for directors to band together around a common cause. While Harvie recently stepped back from Health Care Without Harm to tackle a broader system’s approach, his influence will have lasting effects.

“We can get cheap food, but there are some broader expenses associated with that,” he says. “People are becoming more aware of that. People want to change.” Harvie’s hoping he can help people make that change.  


Foodservice Director has undertaken a bold initiative by identifying people who we believe are having the biggest impact on non-commercial foodservice. Our list may surprise you and should certainly intrigue you. Our honorees have backgrounds as varied as their personalities. They range from the father of the modern-day food truck to the wife of a sitting president. They include operators and suppliers, chefs and consultants, CEOs and civil servants. There are traditionalists and there are mavericks. Well-known names share space with hot newcomers. In all, 17 people, two groups of individuals and one institution compose the list. It’s time to meet FSD’s 20 Most Influential.

More From FoodService Director

Sponsored Content
savory yogurt parfait

From Dannon Foodservice.

What consumers eat and, most importantly, when they’re eating it has changed significantly in recent years, signaling opportunity for operators able to capitalize on this evolution.

For example, some 83% of consumers said they were daily snackers in 2016, according to Technomic’s Snacking Occasion Consumer Trend Report . That’s up from 76% just two years earlier. Snacking is growing across many channels from retail prepared foods to bakery and coffee cafes, fast-food locations and more.

Busy lifestyles, smaller households with greater meal...

Industry News & Opinion

Labor secretary nominee Andy Puzder has officially bowed out of consideration for the cabinet position, according to the Associated Press .

Puzder, CEO of CKE Restaurants—the parent company of Hardee’s and Carl’s Jr.—was tired of being under fire for hiring an undocumented immigrant as a nanny and being accused 26 years ago of physically abusing his wife, an unnamed source told CBS News . The agency reported that Puzder was unlikely to show for the start of his confirmation hearings tomorrow.

Puzder has also been attacked by organized labor for comments suggesting that...

Industry News & Opinion

Risley Dining Room at Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., has just become 100 percent gluten-free, 14850.com reports.

For the past two years, the university has slowly phased out gluten in the dining hall’s menu by eliminating it in its stir fries, biscuits and brownies.

Instead of offering gluten-free versions of typical college fare, including pizza and pasta, the dining service team aimed for more sophisticated restaurant-style items.

Along with being gluten-free, Risley is also peanut free and tree-nut free.

The dining room is the second college eatery...

Industry News & Opinion

James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Va., recently hosted a weeklong program called Weigh the Waste, which aimed to show students how much food gets wasted in dining halls, The Breeze reports.

Throughout the week, students placed food they were about to throw away on a scale located near the trash bins at one of their dining halls. At the end of the week, the school tallied the waste and saw that 817 pounds of food had been wasted.

School officials hope that the annual program, which it’s hosted since 2015, will remind dining hall patrons to only take as much food as...

FSD Resources