Chefs who make a difference

These 10 chefs are influential not only in their operations but their communities as well.

Brian Axworthy
Executive Chef, Assistant Director
Colorado Springs School District 11
Colorado Springs, Colo.

Why Brian?
According to Rick Hughes, director of food and nutrition services:

“Brian is definitely a visionary. Brian has helped us take our program from a mostly highly processed food program to now exclusively scratch-cooked or clean label items. The food tastes so much better and it’s so much better nutritionally. We focus on what are we doing to help students learn in the classroom, and Brian cares greatly about that. Brian’s responsibility is that he must create recipes and menus that taste great to kids for $1.04 per meal total food costs. Those are tall marching orders.

One of the things he’s doing this year is creating a junior chef program to involve kids around the district at some level to provide input about the food being involved in the cafeteria but also learning where food comes from and how do we cook food. He’s very excited to involve students.

Another key initiative this year was, through the USDA commodity foods, to get cut up raw chicken. Going back to cooking raw chicken in schools is pretty scary but I know that we have good food safety programs. That’s another program that Brian is instrumental in pushing forward.

Brian has done culinary boot camps for our staff. There is both time in the kitchen learning culinary techniques and he’s also got some class time when he’s walking through theories and why things are done. He doesn’t just do the heavy lifting. He teaches people how to fish, so to speak.

Brian is in charge of community outreach. He partnered with the local food bank, Care and Share. We were able to serve another 50,000 or 60,000 meals this summer because Care and Share got their food from us. Brian also is in charge of our food rescue program. We experimented with that in 10 of our sites last year. We rescued food and took that to a community center, which worked with one of our local churches to box up meals to serve those from a food pantry for no charge.” 

Pages

More From FoodService Director

Sponsored Content
millennial food trends foodservice

From T. Marzetti® Foodservice.

Their dorm rooms might be messy, but today’s college students want dining halls to clean up and offer less-processed, healthier options.

Millennials are leading the booming “free-from” foods trend. Of the participants in a recent Mintel group study, 60% of millennials said they’re concerned about transparency and clean ingredients in the food they eat. Many of them are currently in college, where they are making their own food decisions for the first time, and millennial preferences are clear: fresh ingredients, healthy options and clean...

Sponsored Content
pear salad

From T. Marzetti® Foodservice.

The definition of “salad” is rapidly expanding, and with increased variation comes increased consumer interest. Diners love the novelty of a fresh take on an old favorite: enough familiarity to ensure they’ll enjoy it and enough innovation to make it an adventure.

Don’t let this super easy—and incredibly popular—food trend pass you by. Here are five ways to get started.

1. Make salad the main event

These days, diners are looking to salads for that main-dish oomph and satisfaction, in part because of salads’ clean ingredients and fresh...

Industry News & Opinion

To add an element of personalization and better connect students with the chefs making their meals, food stations inside the dining halls at the Claremont Colleges in Claremont, Calif., are being renamed after the chefs who work there, The Student Life reports.

This past semester, the school unveiled Eddie’s Toast Bar at its Pitzer Dining Hall and Mike’s Burger Bar at Harvey Mudd Dining Hall. Both stations offer a rotating menu of items prepared by the same chef.

Chef Eddie Soto creates three different toasts for students every other Thursday, while chef Mike Telleria...

Industry News & Opinion

Dining services at the University of Maryland has launched a QR code comment system for student feedback, The Diamondback reports.

The QR codes were printed on table menus in dining halls this past September. To leave feedback, students scan a code with their smartphones, which allows them to leave comments for review.

The College Park, Md., school's dining services recently added a Facebook-like comment wall where students can see that their comments have been received and read, and are able to read and comment on others’ feedback.

"We were missing an important...

FSD Resources