2006 Compensation Study: What I make

Salaries increased 1.9% for FSDs last year. Did yours?

According to FSD’s annual Compensation Study, salaries rose just 1.9% last year across the board. But not many in the business think they’ll be in their current position five years from now.

From: pat <pat@xyz.com>

Date: Tuesday, 2:19 p.m.
January 2, 2007
To: My best friend
Subject: What am I doing?

I just had my review—and I'm getting the same puny raise I got last year: 2%. What an insult—despite the fact that meal volume increased again! I just don't know how much longer I can keep at this. We need the money!

This e-mail between 40-somethings is obviously fictitious, but might very well be true for any number of non-commercial foodservice directors. Salary increases during 2006 trailed the pace of those in 2005. As usual, more money comes from doing more work.

Salaries for non-commercial foodservice directors rose just 1.9% last year, according to FSD’s annual Compensation Study, following a 4.7% boost the year prior. The average salary for 2006 was $53,802, up from $52,774.

If directors are frustrated at this lack of growth, they’d have good reason—because the study shows that nearly 30% of them are managing a larger workforce; three-quarters are wrestling with higher food costs; and a bit more than one-third say capital spending is on the rise, meaning renovations and new construction are eating up their time.

On top of that, meal volume increased for the second straight year for operators in all segments except healthcare. Is it any wonder, then, that precisely one-third of them say they’ll be retired in five years? That 15% figure on being promoted? That just 14% believe they’ll be in their current position?

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