Steven Johnson

Steven Johnson
Associate Editor
foodservicedirector@winsightmedia.com

Steven Johnson is an associate editor for FoodService Director, where he primarily covers colleges and universities. Steven holds a bachelor’s of arts degree in communications from Columbia College in Chicago, and a master’s degree in journalism from Northwestern University. Prior to joining FSD in May 2013, Steven worked as a freelance journalist in the Chicago area, where he was a contributor to such publications as the Chicago Tribune, The Chicago Reporter, The Times of Northwest Indiana and Progress Illinois. Before that time, Steven was a staff reporter for the Courier-News, a daily newspaper where he covered local politics in the city of Elgin. A Chicago native, Steven has lived in pretty much every neighborhood in the city, and as a result, has patronized more bars and pubs than any one person should admit to visiting.

If you weren’t in publishing what would you be doing?
Shooting wedding videos.

Which talent would you most like to have?
I would like to be able to play the guitar. Don’t have the fingers for it.

What is your greatest fear?
Opening up the fridge and finding only a box of baking soda. Wait, that happened last night.

Which living person do you most admire?
My parents.

What would be your dream vacation?
Any place with my wife that doesn’t involve me hiking some trail.

What is your favorite meal?
Barbecued duck. It takes forever to slow cook it on a grill, but very worth the wait when it’s done right.

What is your “guilty pleasure?”
Watching any TV show that involves crime – that means every “Law and Order” and CSI show ever made.

What will people always find in your refrigerator?
Apparently a box of baking soda is the only safe bet.

What is your most treasured possession?
My hats.  


While summer vacation for many kids means endless hours in front of a television or computer screen, one group of middle school children recently got the opportunity to live out their culinary dreams...
Whether an operation feeds thousands of people a day or 500 a week, theft will be a problem the foodservice director faces sooner or later. Foodservice directors are often placed in the difficult...
It’s no secret mobile devices are playing an increasingly pervasive role in the lives of most Americans. None more so than in the lives of college students, where four out of 10 own a...
The role of campus convenience stores is evolving to be more than just a place to grab a bag of chips and a soda. An increasing number of these locations are expanding their food options to include...

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Industry News & Opinion
k-12

The School Nutrition Foundation —the School Nutrition Association’s philanthropic sibling—and Share Our Strength’s No Kid Hungry campaign have partnered to launch an initiative called Schools as Nutrition Hubs.

“No Kid Hungry really sees schools as a critical place in the fight against childhood hunger,” says Laura Hatch, director of national partnerships for No Kid Hungry. “Schools are really a no-brainer because they have the infrastructure, they have the experience, it’s a trusted place for families. And being able to maximize their programs and maximize the federal...

Ideas and Innovation
walk-in cooler

The walk-in cooler can serve as a gathering place for more than just produce. When temperatures rise, staff at Empire State South restaurant in Atlanta host meetings in the walk-in and make occasional trips to hang out throughout the day to beat the back-of-house heat.

Menu Development
college students eating

Taste may reign supreme when college students choose their next snack, but operators should also pay attention to factors such as price and portion size. Here are the most important attributes students consider when choosing snacks, according to Technomic’s 2017 College and University Consumer Trend Report .

Taste: 78%

Ability to satisfy my appetite between meals: 67%

Price: 64%

Portion size: 54%

Familiarity: 46%

Overall nutrition value: 40%

Protein content: 36%

All-natural ingredients: 29%

Fiber content: 27%

...

Managing Your Business
student shame
“We allow students to charge meals at all levels; even in high school, they can charge a certain number of meals. [After that is met,] they are given an alternate meal,” Sharon Glosson, executive director of school nutrition services for North East Independent School District, says. Elementary students can charge up to $15 of meals; middle schoolers can charge $10; and high schoolers can charge $5. “Ultimately, [food services is] carrying out the policy but we’re not necessarily the creators of the policy, or have the final say on the policy, because that budget decision has to be made by the...

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