Confessions of Deanne Carlisle

Deanne Carlisle loves family reunion meals and doesn't understand the fuss over gourmet coffee
Deanne Carlisle, director of foodservices for the VA Medical Center in Portland, Ore., loves family reunion meals and doesn’t understand the fuss over gourmet coffee. 

Q. What is the best part of your job?

No two days are ever alike—each day has its unique challenges as well as opportunities to make a difference for the veterans we are so honored to serve.
 

Q. What is the worst part of your job?

Email jail.

Q. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?

Professionally: President of ASHFSA in 2009 and receiving the Lifetime Achievement Award for AHF in 2010. Personally:My husband, Tim, and I raising our two beautiful girls.
 

Q. What is the most unusual foodservice/catering request you have ever received?

We used an overnight delivery service to bring in fresh orchids, leis and specialty Hawaiian fruits for a premier event when I worked at Oregon Health & Science University.
 

Q. If you weren't in foodservice what would you be doing?

Professional photographer traveling the world for National Geographic. 

Q. Which talent would you most like to have?

Photographic memory.

Q. If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be?

Live more in the moment and not be such a perfectionist.

Q. What is your favorite meal?

Campfires at our family reunions outside Red Lodge, Mont.

Q. What do you consider to be the most overrated foodservice trend?

Gourmet coffee. 

Q. What are your words to live by?

“Shoot for the moon. If you miss, you’ll end up in the stars!” 

Q. If you had a time machine what historical event or era would you visit?

Walking down the Grand Staircase and partaking in 14-course meals with the first-class passengers on the Titanic. 

Q. What would be your dream vacation?

Hiking and sightseeing in all our National Parks.

Q. If you could eat dinner with anyone living or dead, who would it be?

Abraham Lincoln. 

Q. What activity is at the top of your bucket list?

Trekking the Himalayas in Nepal.

More From FoodService Director

Ideas and Innovation
chicken

The Animal Welfare Act became a law in 1966.

This year, 52 years later, animal rights activists have disputed a provision to the 2018 farm bill brought by Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa) called the Protect Interstate Commerce Act that would prohibit states from passing laws regulating “agricultural products,” including farm animals. The amendment would not only prevent states from passing new laws, but it would also remove animal protections already in place. The farm bill failed to get the votes necessary to pass the House of Representatives in May, but the threat of expansive and...

Industry News & Opinion

Beginning this upcoming school year, Palm Springs Unified School District in Palm Springs, Calif., will offer universal free meals , Desert Sun reports .

Through the federal Community Eligibility Provision, PSUSD students will receive breakfast and lunch on school days free of charge.

"Everyone’s going to benefit regardless of their income status," Director of Nutrition Services Stephanie Bruce told Desert Sun. "Every student will have access to a complete meal."

Though students’ families will no longer need to apply for free and reduced-price meals, they will be...

Ideas and Innovation
food waste

With awareness growing about the scope of food waste in America, foodservice operators are ramping up zero-waste efforts—and coming up with more culinary-focused solutions. It’s estimated that 40% of food produced in the United States is wasted, according to the National Resources Defense Council. Although an increase in composting has redirected some of this food waste from landfills to on-site gardens and farms at a number of operations, noncommercial chefs are re-evaluating food scraps for their menu potential.

University of Connecticut in Storrs, Conn., has a longstanding...

Ideas and Innovation
daisies

Jehangir Mehta, chef-owner of Graffiti Earth in New York City and an avid food waste crusader, created a soup from food scraps that even has its own hashtag: #eatmycompostsoup. There’s no standard recipe for the item, which he also introduced to the dining program at University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Instead, the coconut-based soup features vegetable peels, stems and roots left over from the day’s prep and what Mehta calls “cosmetically challenged” vegetables—ingredients that previously may have found their way into the compost bin.

“Using vegetable scraps and ugly produce in...

FSD Resources

Code for Asynchronous jQuery Munchkin Tracking Code