Charred Line Caught Swordfish & Long Bay Shrimp with Western Carolina BBQ Sauce

Menu Part: 
Entree
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
4

Seafood is a heart-healthy, lower fat protein that makes a smart choice when dining out. In the low country states of South Carolina and Georgia, swordfish and shrimp are locally caught in the coastal waters. Here, they’re enhanced with a mustard-based Carolina BBQ sauce to carry out the regional theme.  The flavorful combo would please fish eaters in any part of the country.

Ingredients

Western Carolina BBQ Sauce (recipe follows)
4 (8 oz.) Carolina swordfish steaks
Sea salt, to taste
Freshly ground black pepper
2 tbsp. unsalted butter
8 large Long Bay Shrimp in shells, split lengthwise
2 tbsp. corn oil
4 cups Firecracker Slaw (recipe follows)

Steps

  1. Prepare Western Carolina BBQ Sauce; set aside.
  2. Season swordfish with salt and pepper. Grill over charcoal to med.-rare. Finish in 375°F oven to desired internal doneness.
  3. Heat skillet over med. heat. Add 2 tbsp. butter and melt. Add swordfish; rapidly baste with butter.
  4. Transfer swordfish to a plate lined with a paper towel. Let excess butter be absorbed by the towel.
  5. Toss shrimp in oil. Place on grill, shell-side down; grill until pink.
  6. For service, arrange swordfish, shrimp and Firecracker Slaw on hot plates. Drizzle with Western Carolina BBQ Sauce. Serve immediately.

Western Carolina BBQ Sauce

3 cups apple cider vinegar
3 tbsp. Worcestershire sauce
2 cups tomato ketchup
2 tbsp. brown sugar
2 tsp. peeled, minced fresh ginger
2 tsp. Coleman’s dry mustard
1 1/2 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes
1 tbsp. paprika
2 1/2 tsp. ground black pepper
1 tsp. ground white pepper

  1. Mix all ingredients in non-reactive saucepan. Place over med. heat; bring to a boil.
  2. Reduce heat and simmer for 5 min. Transfer to bowl; reserve.

Firecracker Slaw
1/2 cup green Napa cabbage, cut in long julienne
1/2 cup red cabbage, cut in long julienne
1/4cup carrots, peeled and cut in long julienne
2 tsp. caraway seeds, toasted
1 tbsp. apple cider vinegar
3 tbsp. mayonnaise
Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

  1. Combine all ingredients in bowl except salt and pepper; toss to combine. Season with salt and pepper; chill.
Source: McDonnell, Kinder & Associates

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