Promoting healthy eating

diy healthy eating

CDC gets into recipe business

Everyone, it seems, wants to offer us tips on healthier eating. Even the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has gotten into the act.

The CDC, working with Eating Well magazine, has created a website devoted to healthy recipes and lifestyle tips. The site is called the Healthy Eating and Lifestyle Resource Center, at recipes.millionhearts.hhs.gov. Not only are there hundreds of recipes on the site, there also is a menu plan designed to help you lose weight. The four-week plan has three options: maintain your weight, lose one pound a week or lose two pounds a week. The plan even comes with a printable shopping list.

According to the CDC, the website was created as part of the Million Hearts initiative, which was launched in September 2011 with the goal of preventing one million heart attacks and strokes by 2017.


DIY equals healthier eating, study suggests

People who spend more time preparing their own meals tend to eat more healthfully, according to research by the Center for Diet and Activity Research. Examining data from a 2009 study on obesity, a research team at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom concluded there is a link between cooking and what people eat.

“One of the measurements that we had was the amount of time that people spend on food preparation,” Pablo Monsivais, team leader, told Reuters. In reviewing the data, Monsivais noted, people who spent the most time preparing meals ate an average of 13 servings of vegetables and eight servings of fruit per week. Those who spent the least amount of time cooking ate fewer than 11 servings of vegetables and six servings of fruit.

Those spending the most time in the kitchen also spent the least amount of money on food—about $7 less per family member—than any other group.

The authors of the study, which was published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, cautioned that their research doesn’t prove a correlation between time spent on food preparation and healthier diets. However, says Monsivais, “We should be aware up front that if we have intentions of having a healthier diet it might be the case that we just have to spend more time in the kitchen.”


This juice can have you hopping around in no time

What’s green and red, goes 175 miles an hour and can help cure what ails you? A frog in a blender.

Turns out, that’s no joke to some people in Peru, who believe a blended drink made with frog can cure everything from asthma to tuberculosis. The recipe is simple: Place one dead, skinned frog in a blender, add carrots, maca root and honey, and puree.

Of course, you can’t use just any old frog. You must use the Titicaca water frog—which may explain why the frog is listed on the “critically endangered” list by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

Although Andean cultures swear by the drink’s ability to help with anemia, bronchitis, fatigue, stress and other ailments, there is no scientific evidence that the elixir really works.


We love our meat

Think vegetarians are a growing force to be reckoned with, menu-wise? The Humane Research Council says, not so fast.

A recent study by the animal rights group contains some interesting “bites” of information. According to the survey of 11,000 adults, conducted by Harris Interactive, a mere 2% of Americans say that they are vegetarians or vegans, and only 12% have ever even tried to go meatless.

In addition, of those people who were once vegetarians, 84% have gone back to being omnivores. However, the study also revealed that 37% of former vegetarians said they would consider switching back at some point.


17% of Americans are snacking more

That’s the percentage of Americans who say they are snacking more than they did a year ago, according to a Nielsen survey of 1,139 people, commissioned by General Mills. Other numbers from the survey: 91% said they snack at least once a day, 21% said they snack three or four times a day and 3% said they are” always snacking.” When it comes to snacks, the survey revealed that women prefer chocolate, candy or cookies. For men, the snacks of choice are pretzels and chips. 

More From FoodService Director

Ideas and Innovation
chicken

The Animal Welfare Act became a law in 1966.

This year, 52 years later, animal rights activists have disputed a provision to the 2018 farm bill brought by Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa) called the Protect Interstate Commerce Act that would prohibit states from passing laws regulating “agricultural products,” including farm animals. The amendment would not only prevent states from passing new laws, but it would also remove animal protections already in place. The farm bill failed to get the votes necessary to pass the House of Representatives in May, but the threat of expansive and...

Industry News & Opinion

Beginning this upcoming school year, Palm Springs Unified School District in Palm Springs, Calif., will offer universal free meals , Desert Sun reports .

Through the federal Community Eligibility Provision, PSUSD students will receive breakfast and lunch on school days free of charge.

"Everyone’s going to benefit regardless of their income status," Director of Nutrition Services Stephanie Bruce told Desert Sun. "Every student will have access to a complete meal."

Though students’ families will no longer need to apply for free and reduced-price meals, they will be...

Ideas and Innovation
food waste

With awareness growing about the scope of food waste in America, foodservice operators are ramping up zero-waste efforts—and coming up with more culinary-focused solutions. It’s estimated that 40% of food produced in the United States is wasted, according to the National Resources Defense Council. Although an increase in composting has redirected some of this food waste from landfills to on-site gardens and farms at a number of operations, noncommercial chefs are re-evaluating food scraps for their menu potential.

University of Connecticut in Storrs, Conn., has a longstanding...

Ideas and Innovation
daisies

Jehangir Mehta, chef-owner of Graffiti Earth in New York City and an avid food waste crusader, created a soup from food scraps that even has its own hashtag: #eatmycompostsoup. There’s no standard recipe for the item, which he also introduced to the dining program at University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Instead, the coconut-based soup features vegetable peels, stems and roots left over from the day’s prep and what Mehta calls “cosmetically challenged” vegetables—ingredients that previously may have found their way into the compost bin.

“Using vegetable scraps and ugly produce in...

FSD Resources

Code for Asynchronous jQuery Munchkin Tracking Code