MenuDirections 2013: Day Two Highlights

Coming face-to-face with a pig's head adds clarity on FSDs' changing roles

It’s not a routine conference when the speaker reaches for the severed pig’s head on the counter and lifts off the face, explaining he’d carved it free earlier so he’d have time to saw apart the carcass that’d been parted from the skull (“The brain’s still in there, but that’s okay.”)

Welcome to one of the more extraordinary sessions of Menu Directions 2013 and the lens it provides on how the food service director’s job is changing. During one of the conference's 30-Minute Universities, Stephen Gerike of the National Pork Board broke down half a pig and a whole hog’s head to show the audience where familiar pork specialties come from. In the process, he underscored how much more the FSD has to know today to do his or her job, a message that was sounded repeatedly from the stage and in casual conversations.

Clearly that responsibility extends far beyond feeding tens or hundreds of thousands of people per day. During the MenuDirections awards banquet, FSD of the Year candidate Eric Goldestein was lauded for serving almost 900,000 meals daily in New York City schools. But what drew gasps from the audience was the observation that he also oversees student transportation within the nation’s largest school district.

In feedback to speakers and chatter during breaks, attendees noted that their responsibilities now extend to housing, laundry services and, perhaps most routinely, the concessions in stadiums and other facilities connected to a non-commercial foodservice operation. Once, the worry was making food look good on the line. Now, as West Point’s Kevin D’Onofrio noted at one breakfast, it's adjusting to a game day snowstorm that cuts revenues from  your stadium concessions by some 70%.

But it’s not just a matter of new areas of responsibility being added. As the pig-carving 30-Minute University illustrated, FSDs need to know far more today about their core responsibilities of serving food. It’s no longer merely a challenge of finding the "Peel Back Here" corner on frozen product. They need to have a grasp on where their food comes from, and what to do about dynamics like the surge in gluten-free dining.

More From FoodService Director

Managing Your Business
Senior Living Staff Cafeteria

FoodService Director recently spoke with operators across the country to see how they’re handling today’s labor challenges. One was Moe Memmolo, general manager for dining services at Taylor Senior Living Community in Laconia, N.H. Read on for his thoughts.

FSD : What’s your short- and long-term outlook for staffing, and what’s the most significant challenge to staffing?

MM: Laconia is part of what’s called the Lakes Region. It’s a seasonal enclave with many vacationers, a summerlong concert venue and an event called “Bike Week.” This all means competing with even more employers,...

Menu Development
Spicy Ramen Noodles Pork Shoyu Miso

Instant ramen has long been a go-to meal or snack for college students.

But the ramen being ladled up now in dining halls and other noncommercial venues is culinary light-years beyond those cellophane-wrapped packets. The broth alone can take a couple of days to make, the ingredients may be sourced from Japan—or at the very least, from an Asian distributor—and even the noodles may be made from scratch.

Authenticity is key. Or is it?

Ramen fuels a new concept

The Omori Ramen Bar debuted at Boston University in January, with input from the BU community to nail the...

Industry News & Opinion

As the topic of food insecurity continues to roil college campuses, the University of California Santa Barbara is seeking to meet its students’ needs with the addition of a second food pantry, which debuted last fall.

Miramar Food Pantry, which is open three days a week, is available to any UCSB student who qualifies, according to The Current, the news section of UCSB’s website. The pantry took over the space of a former retail market and is being run and funded by the university’s Housing, Dining and Auxiliary Enterprises.

“We’re supplementing what we get from the Foodbank...

Sponsored Content
Voyagers counter

From our partner LTI, Inc.

Building out a serving line comes with its fair share of challenges. Layout and design decisions come first, but operators must then decide how they plan on implementing that layout. Chief among those considerations is whether to use a modular or a customized one-piece serving counter.

When deciding on which type of counter, it becomes important to understand the advantages and disadvantages of both. Doing so will ensure counter chosen will meet the facility’s serving needs and will also help avoid issues in areas such as cleaning, electrical...

FSD Resources