Stay on trend with kid-friendly cuisine

From Bush's Best®.

From the First Lady’s “Let’s Move” initiative to the National Restaurant Association’s (NRA) “Kids LiveWell” program, it’s apparent that children’s nutrition has become a key trend for 2013. Parents now have a much higher expectation for their kids’ dining experiences. And as children are becoming more adventurous in their eating habits, they’re also more willing to try a healthy menu item as long as it doesn’t sacrifice flavor.

In the NRA’s “What’s Hot in 2013” survey of more than 1800 chefs, healthful kids’ meals were ranked as the third hottest trend1, with 78% of chefs calling healthful kids’ meals a hot trend. 67% of chefs surveyed also ranked kids’ fruit and vegetable sides as a hot trend. With research supporting this shift in kids’ palates, restaurants are upgrading their menus to embrace parental ideals for healthful and flavorful kids’ meals. In an interview with USA Today, Margo Wootan of the Center for Science in the Public Interest said, “This is an exciting beginning for parents who eat out a lot. This [Kids LiveWell] is opening the door to much healthier cuisine.”2

Beans are an easy way to incorporate kid-friendly menu options. With Bush’s Best® Beans, you can create healthier versions of kids’ favorites without skimping on flavor. They’re nutrient-rich, low in calories, low in fat, cholesterol-free and packed with flavor. In fact, Bush’s Best® Baked Beans have more protein, iron, potassium and fiber than broccoli, carrots or corn. Since kids already give beans a thumbs up3, Bush’s Best® makes it that much easier to please picky eaters. And with their incredible versatility, you can make anything from dips and sides to salads, appetizers, soups and main courses. With Bush’s Best® Beans, there are endless possibilities for kid-centric menu items.

1 Stat sourced from the NRA’s “What’s Hot” 2013 Chef Survey
22011 USA Today, 15000 Restaurants Order Healthy New Kids Meals
3 2007 Impulse Research, on behalf of the makers of Bush’s Best

More From FoodService Director

Industry News & Opinion

As part of a 10-year contract to run Eastern Michigan University’s foodservice, Chartwells will invest $5 million in the Ypsilanti, Mich., university, as well as provide it with $18 million in capital improvements, according to a report by the Detroit Free Press .

The university’s board of regents approved the contract on Tuesday, citing the new revenue as an opportunity to expand and improve campus foodservice. EMU’s website indicates the partnership will allow for more student input as well as the introduction of food trucks and improved technology.

“The primary reason...

Industry News & Opinion

Students at the University of Virginia will soon be able to use part of their meal plans to buy fresh food grown locally, the result of a new partnership between the school and Greens to Grounds, a nonprofit organization run by students.

Starting in the fall, students will be able to use their meal plan “Plus Dollars” to purchase premade food boxes from Greens to Grounds. The boxes, which come in “snack” or “produce” options, contain a variety of vegetables and fruits with a different weekly menu. The packages typically cost no more than $10, and students will be able to place box...

Industry News & Opinion

The USDA analyzed the efficacy of using Medicaid data to certify students for free or reduced-price lunch, a provision included in the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. Participating states and districts reported conflicting data on changes in the percentage of students certified, number of meals served, federal reimbursements and certification costs.

The method is used as an alternative to household applications and data matching with other public benefit programs to streamline the certification of more low-income students. The program was first piloted statewide in Kentucky...

Ideas and Innovation
kids students cafeteria line

While summer feeding programs are commonplace in school districts across the country, foodservice operators still struggle to get the word out and kids in.

Many districts are scaling back or discontinuing their summer feeding programs due to low participation, citing staffing costs and other issues that make it difficult to break even and provide a profitable program.

“We need to find a way to encourage that participation,” Tom Freitas—foodservice director for Traverse City Area Public Schools in Traverse City, Mich.—told Record Eagle News . “We are open to ideas as long as...

FSD Resources