Stay on trend with kid-friendly cuisine

From Bush's Best®.

From the First Lady’s “Let’s Move” initiative to the National Restaurant Association’s (NRA) “Kids LiveWell” program, it’s apparent that children’s nutrition has become a key trend for 2013. Parents now have a much higher expectation for their kids’ dining experiences. And as children are becoming more adventurous in their eating habits, they’re also more willing to try a healthy menu item as long as it doesn’t sacrifice flavor.

In the NRA’s “What’s Hot in 2013” survey of more than 1800 chefs, healthful kids’ meals were ranked as the third hottest trend1, with 78% of chefs calling healthful kids’ meals a hot trend. 67% of chefs surveyed also ranked kids’ fruit and vegetable sides as a hot trend. With research supporting this shift in kids’ palates, restaurants are upgrading their menus to embrace parental ideals for healthful and flavorful kids’ meals. In an interview with USA Today, Margo Wootan of the Center for Science in the Public Interest said, “This is an exciting beginning for parents who eat out a lot. This [Kids LiveWell] is opening the door to much healthier cuisine.”2

Beans are an easy way to incorporate kid-friendly menu options. With Bush’s Best® Beans, you can create healthier versions of kids’ favorites without skimping on flavor. They’re nutrient-rich, low in calories, low in fat, cholesterol-free and packed with flavor. In fact, Bush’s Best® Baked Beans have more protein, iron, potassium and fiber than broccoli, carrots or corn. Since kids already give beans a thumbs up3, Bush’s Best® makes it that much easier to please picky eaters. And with their incredible versatility, you can make anything from dips and sides to salads, appetizers, soups and main courses. With Bush’s Best® Beans, there are endless possibilities for kid-centric menu items.

1 Stat sourced from the NRA’s “What’s Hot” 2013 Chef Survey
22011 USA Today, 15000 Restaurants Order Healthy New Kids Meals
3 2007 Impulse Research, on behalf of the makers of Bush’s Best

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