Outshining the competition with flavorful and creative turkey items

From Foster Farms.

Noncommercial foodservice operators compete for customers just as vigorously as any restaurateur on the street. In virtually any college and university dining hall, corporate dining cafeteria or healthcare café you'll find sophisticated, on-trend dishes, often prepared with fresh foods from local farmers.

Operators in these hotly contested segments share a need for a versatile, healthful and flavorful protein that lends itself to creative menu planning in noncommercial foodservice. With fewer calories than beef or chicken and no saturated fat, Foster Farms Turkey stands out for its nutritional qualities as well as its great, familiar taste that can be combined easily with a myriad of flavors and ingredients. Foster Farms turkey can be served hot or cold, in any daypart and in countless ways!

To explore the versatility of Foster Farms Turkey, visit the new Turkey Menu Creations website at www.fosterfarmsturkey.com. There you'll find recipes, menu builds and profit plans for offerings such as Baked Turkey and Polenta Bruschetta, California Turkey Burgers, Sesame Soba Noodle and Thai Red Curry Turkey. All told, there are dozens of turkey appetizers, sandwiches, salads, soups and entrees there to inspire you. The recipe pictures, builds and costings on the Turkey Menu Creations site are especially handy for operators who want to add exciting new items but have little time for menu development.

Jeff Hayman, Marketing Manager for Foodservice Turkey at Foster Farms states "The website allows the operator to easily see how to build the item, an approximate cost and illustrate how much profit the item could make—there is no guesswork."

Among the products that are winning raves are Foster Farms Turkey Burgers, which are flavorful options in the red-hot gourmet burger trend and some of the biggest turkey burger fans are on campus. College and university operators, along with their peers in corporate dining and healthcare, also find Foster Farms Roast Turkeys and Deli Turkey Breasts to be equally suited to creative menu planning and they know Foster Farms Turkey has an authentic and natural turkey taste.

What's more, the Foster Farms Brand has a special connection to consumers on the West Coast. Foster Farms Turkeys have been locally raised in California since 1939, when Max and Verda Foster founded their company, which is still family owned and operated to this day.

"Our customers like to deal with Foster Farms because we are still owned and operated by the Foster family," says Hayman. "There are few family heritage-based companies like us left in the foodservice industry."

Foster Farms Recipe: Pecan Cranberry Turkey Salad with Goat Cheese
Serves 1

Salad Ingredients:
4 oz. Foster Farms Fully Cooked Signature Carving Oil Browned Turkey Breast, julienned
4 oz. Mixed field greens
1/8 cup Dried cranberries
¼ Red bell pepper, sliced
¾ oz. Cucumbers, sliced
½ oz Red onion, sliced thinly
½ oz Mushrooms, quartered
¼ tsp. Parsley, chopped
1 oz Goat cheese, crumbled
4 each Pecan halves, toasted

Dressing Ingredients:
½ cup Greek yogurt, low fat, plain
2 tbsp. Mayonnaise
½ tbsp. Chives, chopped finely
½ tbsp. Parsley, chopped
½ tsp. Tarragon, chopped
2 tbsp. Olive oil
1 tsp. Lemon juice
¼ tsp. Salt
¼ tsp. Pepper

Directions:

  1. For the yogurt dressing, whisk yogurt, mayonnaise, herbs, oil, lemon juice and salt and pepper to taste in a large bowl.
  2. In a separate bowl, toss field greens, cranberries, cucumber, bell pepper, red onion and mushrooms with olive oil and lemon juice. Arrange on the serving plate.
  3. Arrange the turkey breast on the salad. Drizzle with the yogurt dressing. Sprinkle with the parsley, goat cheese and pecans.

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